5 Ways Microsoft Messed Up Mobile - InformationWeek

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5 Ways Microsoft Messed Up Mobile
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PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2015 | 12:25:06 PM
Re: Microsoft, No Mobile
@ Ashu001.  You made an excellent point.  I'm sure Microsoft has a plan on how they want to tackle mobile.  We do not know what it is but, I'm sure all their best and brightest are working on it. we just have to be patient and see what they will bring.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2015 | 8:30:59 AM
Re: Microsoft, No Mobile
Two things. One is that the Hololens isn't a product yet. Will it ever be? Really, we don't know yet. But, Microsoft has Kinect. I hope people remember that it sold a large number in a short while, and was being touted by Microsoft as the next major thing. But it failed in the longer term. I suspect the same thing will happen to VR headsets. There is no evidence that the problems of disorientation will ever really be fixed. That's just one problem. About the Apple Watch. There's no evidence that watch sales have dropped dramatically. It's just the opinion of one company. Others have very different opinions on that.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2015 | 8:27:15 AM
Re: Windows CE != Windows Mobile
Well, you still can't run an x86 app on an ARM CPU. And ARM is more limited than x86. So a simple recompile doesn't cut it. Maybe is the x86 app is pretty simple, but if not, it's going to take more than a bit of work to get it to function, API or not. It's really a myth that a recompile solves all problems.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2015 | 8:23:04 AM
Re: Windows CE != Windows Mobile
What you're saying isn't entirely true. There were various versions of CE out there. For WinMobile, there was CE R1, and then R2. Other versions were for embedded, which is what you're thinking of. Then there was a version that allowed multiple cores, and higher Rez screens. WinMobile used a more Plain Jane version that was closer to a realtime OS. But it wasn't very robust in regards to hardware. When Microsoft came out with Win Phone 7, they just took the same CE used for Win Mobile, and updated it to R3, and added the Zune HD UI.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2015 | 8:02:57 AM
Re: Microsoft, No Mobile
I think the Hololens tells us that yes Microsoft will get into wearables at some level.  I think they are still trying to figure out what people really want in the wearables market.  Right now there is a very wide range of products and nothing is very clearly winning yet.  I see more and more people with fitness tracker type wearables that are little more than accelerometers with no display, then a middle ground which I wear that displays notifications and various information but doesn't run apps then lastly you have the high end that runs dedicated apps.  Apple has seen sales of the iWatch drop dramatically and I think that's because they are stretching to make it act like a tiny smart phone.  I don't think the market is quite ready for that but it will be in the next few years so I expect Microsoft to come in about that time as things start to settle.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2015 | 3:31:29 AM
Re: Pending Review
Agreed, the wearable market could turn into a high growth market for Microsoft. IoT in general should be in the focus. Utility systems, automobiles and energy efficient buildings, etc., are areas that have been experiencing a high growth rate in 2015, and these fall under the IoT domain.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2015 | 3:13:19 AM
Re: Microsoft, No Mobile
@Kelly22, good point about the powerhouse and product orientation factor. Another factor that contributed to Microsoft's immobility was the cloud and its initial reluctance of the cloud -- giving rise to Salesforce. I guess, it is difficult to make a move if every player in the market informs a software company that software is changing, either, due to mobile or the cloud. Open source was another doomsday scenario for proprietary software that had to be studied at the time. 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2015 | 2:53:57 AM
Re: Microsoft, No Mobile
That is an interesting point. It might have been that Microsoft bought Nokia to acquire a little time to refocus. A $7.6 billion impairment cost is a lot to spend on holding a market position for a year. Maybe, holding at least a 2.7% market share was a strategy to set the stage for the next Windows. After all, time has allowed semiconductors to progress and Windows on mobile requires resources.
liverdonor
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liverdonor,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2015 | 12:47:23 AM
Re: Windows CE != Windows Mobile
Oh, and by the way: Windows 10 is just Windows 10, as far as the API is concerned.

There are a few places where the API differs (mainly, there are system calls for things like getting your aGPS coordinates, or placing a phone call) which aren't on the main Win10 for PCs distribution, and there are some calls in the PC distro that aren't in the Mobile distribution (for example, you can't run a Classic Win32 app on a Mobile platform). But other than that, you can basically build one app that runs on all platforms from IoT -> Server (even Azure) and just recompile and release for whatever platform you want.

Outside of Microsoft, not many are making noise about this, but as a developer who's been building Windows apps since Windows 2.0, believe me, it's groundbreaking.

Neither Apple (iOS, OSX) nor Google (Android, Chrome, Cloud Platform, Glass, Autos, etc. etc.) has anything like this.

This is Nadella's true accomplishment, in my opinion - getting the herd of cats that is Microsoft to truly capitalize on its broad reach by making its stuff run the same everywhere.

And by doing so, he's paradoxically bringing about the end of the monolithic Windows culture.

Whod'a thunk it?
liverdonor
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liverdonor,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2015 | 12:33:02 AM
Windows CE != Windows Mobile
from the article:

 Frank Gillett, Forrester VP and principal analyst, in an email to InformationWeek. "Windows CE was not succeeding compared to Blackberry and Palm, and the iPhone was transformative beyond those two."

Windows CE was succeeding very well in its own space (small devices with displays or what we now call "Internet of Things" devices). The new IoT edition of Windows 10, which is in some ways a re-incarnation of WinCE, will also do well in that area. In fact, there are companies around the world who are still using CE 6 and 7 in everything from cash registers to sphygmomanometers. Windows CE has sold more licenses than Android and IOS put together during its 15+ year lifespan; it's just that you rarely see the logo when you're taking cash out of your autoteller. But, CE IS NOT Windows Mobile, even though they were based on the same kernel. Neither is XBox the same as Windows, again, even though the original kernel is the NT kernel.

What he should have been commenting about was Windows Mobile, which is the scaled-down Windows NT platform that was built for cellular devices.

And his statement was incorrect. Windows Mobile 6 and 6.5 both outsold Blackberry for two years, before the iPhone changed the mobile playing field.

Where Microsoft really fell down was, they should have continued to push the business market instead of haring off after Apple and trying to beat them. They couldn't beat Apple because their business strategy and fundamental approach are different.

Apple still struggles in the business market. Really, this is the story of how Google conquered the mobile and cloud space. If Microsoft had pursued their business clients and kept up with the hardware OEMs (such as Sony, who was in their camp until Microsoft basically snubbed them), they would have had a solid business market upon which to build their "new" Windows Phone UI. But the screwed the pooch, abandoned the business market, and ended up pursuing the consumer market which they failed to take.

It's really sad. Unless you are a Google shareholder. :-)

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