UC San Diego Researchers Amp Up Internet Speeds - InformationWeek

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UC San Diego Researchers Amp Up Internet Speeds
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batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 1:25:43 AM
Re: Amped
@Thomas Claburn, same here... I have the same hope... but I would be prepared to expect worst until it get better....
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 1:24:21 AM
Re: Amped
@AlanH2933 sad reality of corporate games...but I do hope we gonna see it before we die...
AlanH2933
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AlanH2933,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/30/2015 | 4:38:29 PM
Re: Amped
I agree with the previous posters.

This new technology for increased Internet speeds will be hampered and stalled by every telecommunications company (Time Warner, COX, COMCAST... etc. etc.) because they will have to remove "old" and install "new" equipment and pay a licensing / royalty fee to UCSD (or whoever) to make this a reality.

Also, the Telco's (Telecommunication) like Time Warner, Cox and Comcast want to charge MORE... Not LESS for increased Internet speed to their customers.  Each of these companies are a monopoly (which should be illegal according to the Sherman Antitrust Act) and they can do whatever they want to impede progress at a lessor cost to the consumer.


Don't look for this "new" higher speed Internet discovery to show up until we are long dead and buried!!

What a shame, isn't it!!! :-((
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 7:59:22 AM
Re: UC San Diego Researchers Amp Up Internet Speeds
I like to consider myself pretty sharp, and a pretty quick study when tackling something new, but jeeze - more than a couple lines of this stuff goes right over my head. I understand, basically, the science at play here; travelling over long distances produces a (predictable) distortion effect in the data being transferred, and the scientists have found a way to compensate when the trasmission is made. That much actually seems pretty straightforward - indeed, the paper from last year said: "...the described [current] state of affairs is at the least surprising, considering that the nonlinear impairment... should be effectively mitigated, if not fully cancellable." As soon as we start talking about "the carrier frequency uncertainty, as well as in its stochastic variations", though, I'm pretty glad I decided not go for that doctorate.

Anyway, if I'm understanding it right, this allows more power to be sent with the data at the time of transmission (because increased power normally results in increased interference), which is what allows it to travel farther without the need for regenerators? That makes sense, but it does seem likely that we're looking at some years before that's the standard. Networks need to be rebuilt to take advantage of the lack of regenerators, right? The two ends of a given fiber link would also need to be modified to use the technology developed by the UC SD researchers once it's ready, wouldn't they?  Since the University has put a patent on it, widespread adoption  may be hindered - without which, this approach loses some value; transfers won't actually be that much faster unless they're moving only on these kinds of fiber links. Still, very promising and interesting. Thanks for sharing, Nathan!
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
6/29/2015 | 6:58:32 PM
Re: Amped
I'd like to be optimistic but there always seems to be a bottleneck somewhere that undermines such gains.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2015 | 5:58:24 PM
Not Even A Remote Possibility Under the US Broadband Status Quo
<excerpt>

 

[...] however, it's not clear when something of this could move from the lab to the enterprise.

 

 R&D can generate all kinds of digital goodliness, and, as long as Congress continues to be bought off by industry, and, thusly only permitting a broadband duopoly in any given market, the answer is never.

danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2015 | 4:08:16 PM
Amped
This is good. As we enter an era where new platforms like virtual reality are set to take hold, I expect the amount of throughput needed for our disposal is going to increase dramatically. Any research that is done to clear up some of these issues in terms of crosstalk or degredation of signal is warranted. 


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