'Leap Second' Clocks In On June 30 - InformationWeek

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'Leap Second' Clocks In On June 30
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Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
6/24/2015 | 2:22:09 PM
Forget lattitude, just use attitude
"Seriously, could this really be a problem that had to be corrected. LinuxGuy-VPK" If you detach time from the solar day, then you have to start making adjustments in longitude and navigation. Longitude zero or the prime meridian runs through Greenwich, England, and for centuries, travelers have gauged where they are in the world based on the amount of time they've traveled at what speed and maps using lattitude and longitude. If we ignore the solar day, then the prime meridian has to start migrating from Greenwich toward Paris at the rate of a football field a year. This isn't a problem for LinuxGuy, who would dispense with all that longitude and lattitude hocus pocus and just use attitude. (Tip of the hat to Rob Seaman, data engineer at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, who pointed this out.)
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
6/18/2015 | 1:14:31 PM
The solar day makes sense to a lot of humanity, historically speaking
LinuxGuy, I have to disagree. Precise time-keeping originally had to do with navigating oceans in saling ships. Pendumlum based clocks for time-keeping didn't work, due to the rocking motion of the ship. And surely you're familiar with the difficulties of determining latitude and longitude using a sextant. You have to precisely capture the angle of the moon or a star to the horizon... oh nevermind. Noon and midnight need to be fixed points in the day against which other time processes can be aligned. To have different parties moving them around, depending on whether they wish to observe solar time or not makes no sense to most of humanity.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
6/17/2015 | 1:05:59 PM
Needed: A way to resolve time-keeping issues
Anyone think we could use a Court of Appeals for time issues? Of course, we don't have one. Remember, there are legal consequences when your medical device delivers a time stamp that differs from that of the NTP protocol.


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