RFID Chips In Windshields: Simple Way To Catch Bad Guys - InformationWeek

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RFID Chips In Windshields: Simple Way To Catch Bad Guys
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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/8/2015 | 12:15:10 PM
Re: Any NFC Smartphone
@Brian.Deen- Ha! So will self-driving cars. I think in 10-20 years all Grand Theft Auto games will have to be set in the past like Vice City and San Adreas.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
6/7/2015 | 2:21:15 AM
Re: in sync?
Both ideas are great. The average car has an average life of 10 years. The old cars can be retrofitted and the newer cars can be tracked by a number of ways for instance, through GPS. After 10 years, the infrastructure to track old cars can be exported to developing economies where, cars have an average life of +20 years. 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
6/7/2015 | 1:58:15 AM
Re: Any NFC Smartphone
@David, the fully electric and hybrid cars are quite expensive hence, it would be a good idea to implement tagging technology so that auto theft becomes a thing of the past. I feel that the future smart cars and driverless cars will also be a little bit expensive initially until, economies of scale takes over. RFID is going to kill the GTA (the game) franchise.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/5/2015 | 4:05:14 PM
Re: in sync?
@TerryB- Windshield replacement is annoying as heck. I've had to replace the one on my car three times and it needs it again. The maker of the car even paid for one because they admitted the design of the windshield was flawed and paid for a replacement via class aciton suit. 

Still, my windshield is full of stickers that I have to move from oil change to parking permits and they all come off. I assume we can make an RFID tag that does, too. But I'll admit i didn't look into it.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 3:04:14 PM
Re: in sync?
Definitely wasn't proposing retrofit, just a new capability in new cars since most are being connected now anyway.

I get you on connecting to home office and stuff but that could still be POTS line based. If I have to pay $24 a month for POTS line or $89 a month for ISP connection, I know which way I'm going. We have machines and natural gas supplies here managed by vendors with old fashioned dial up modems. For low bandwidth tasks, you still can't beat the cost.

About only other thing I can think of on this plan which would irritate me is windshield replacement, which I'm going to have to do soon because a rock chipped it. So would I have to go to DMV and get another RFID sticker or you going to have the guy replacing my windshield deal with it? I certainly would not be happy about having any new reason to visit DMV. I'm so happy I can do my registration renewal by mail now.

Although, if you really wanted to take all the cost out, you could give the police a RFID reader and DMV could do away with creating those stickers you put on license plate to show you are current. That would recoup some of the cost of this system. those things are not cheap.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/5/2015 | 2:48:07 PM
Re: in sync?
@TerryB- Oh, you could do it lots of ways. but retrofiting millions of cars to be connected seems far more expensive than a stick on the windshield. 

As for the gas stations being connected, most should be in the US. Not only do they need it for point of sale, but most gas stations in most states have other needs including their supply monitors that connect to their home office, communicating with the state if they do inspection, other stuff with a national home office, etc. 

I think the internet part is the easy part. As for the back end, to me, if you've already got a robust DMV system that talks to the police (as most states do, you're really only talking about adding a few lines to a database. It isn't a small task, but it is a managable one. 
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 2:32:27 PM
Re: RFID Chips In Windshields: Simple Way To Catch Bad Guys
Bolovia makes a great poster child for this, because we don't necessarily think of them as being a technology pioneer - if they can pull it off, who else can? The video mentions matching the car's RFID with it's license plate - does this mean all gas stations have to have suitable cameras as well? What about false positives from the cameras getting plate #s wrong? This adds to the cost. We also have more complexity here in the US that would make it difficult. Not just the amount of cars; think about states where people would be resistant to this on principle (like 'Live Free or Die' New Hampshire) - then, if some states implement and others don't, how does interstate regulation work? Similar problems come up for golf clubs, etc - what if you don't mind being a VIP sometimes, but other times you don't want to be bothered? You need two sets of clubs? What about first-sale doctrine for relevant goods? 

Irritation at police having yet another excuse to pull one over is warranted, as are privacy concerns - actually, this reminded me of your article on retinal scans from the other week, so I was surprised not to hear you come down more in favor of privacy - but it does have some benefit for the motorist. The old 'license and registration' process can be pretty painful. I went on a trip with friends the other week, and we got pulled over because our (newly purchased) car wasn't registered in the state we were driving through. Although the owner was pretty sure he was in the grace period, he wasn't certain. The officer dissapeared for almost 20 minutes before coming back and saying that she wasn't certain, either - but she handed him a $60 ticket, just for the heck of it. An RFID system could eliminate this uncertainty and, moreover, save you a bit of time if you're going to get a ticket anyway.
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 2:29:45 PM
Re: in sync?
@TerryB,

I actually think you make an important point here:

Plus the people to maintain and operate this system. 

Does whoever produces the RFID have the resources and personnel to provide customer service? To fix all the little things that could go wrong. I mean, how many gas station owners know about technology?
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 2:22:04 PM
Re: in sync?
@Dave, well guess to someone not in technical work (and not on InformationWeek), 1M points of data sounds impressive and the bad guys better watch out 'cause we've got this under control! ; )
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 1:11:53 PM
Re: in sync?
Seems like your assumption is all gas stations can get to the internet? And maybe they can, I really don't know if the system that processes your credit/debit card is internet or some private type circuit. But there is a recurring cost to having a circuit to internet, more cost than just buying a RFID reader.

On the server side, there is substantial cost in the hardware/database needed to scale to US levels. Plus the people to maintain and operate this system. Whether that would integrate into existing DMV systems and personnel, I have no idea.

Keep in mind you could circumvent entire thing by filling up several 5 gallon gas cans and taking those to your car outside the range of the readers. Cumbersome yes, but if you can't register car because of DUI or something, and you insist on still driving, it could be easily done.

Seems like you could do same thing by connecting the cars themselves, which most are already today. It could then transmit it's VIN and easily be cross checked to registration or anything else you wanted to check on. And that would be useful if car is stolen. I think that day will get here faster than RFID and gas station readers.
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