Tesla Energy: Changing How Businesses, Homes Use Power - InformationWeek

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Tesla Energy: Changing How Businesses, Homes Use Power
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PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
5/9/2015 | 10:23:44 AM
Re: Toy for the Rich
That is a really good point. Using batteries to help support developed countries.  I do want to know whether Tesla would want to partner with government. They could do a trial in South Africa for local business and remote areas.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
5/4/2015 | 5:36:26 AM
Re: Toy for the Rich
Even if this isn't something that catches on at home however, it has huge potential in enterprise environments. If some of the world's biggest power draws could be removed from peak hours, that could really ease the strain on the grid and make it far easier to balance loads during spikes. On top of that, if there is a dip, power companies could utilise this crowd-funded power storage tech to offload the additional power, instead of shutting down stations temporarily, which can be incredibly inefficient. 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/4/2015 | 3:04:33 AM
Re: Nothing innovative here! ...moving stuck inventory.
@KarlQuick, you have raised some good points. The architecture of the home battery is an unknown variable at the moment. For CPUs to go from PCs to mobile devices, the architecture had to evolve and go from performance orientated towards power orientated. However, credit goes to the PC industry for creating the economies of scale and production at a leave where a mobile chip became feasible. Likewise, weight is a consideration for a home battery but as you said, it might not be the ultimate consideration. 

I will have to research the Powerwall in detail. What is the weight of the 10Kwh battery? How many hours does it take to fully recharge? And, what kind of depreciation cycle will they undergo? Etc. If the numbers do come out to be economically feasible then, credit will have to go to the automotive industry because, I don't see the smart phone battery evolving into a home or datacenter battery. But, an automotive battery might do the trick.

The problem with a gas generator is that they can be extremely inefficient. For instance, they can cost $2 an hour if demand is 100 watts or 11kwh.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/4/2015 | 2:34:11 AM
Re: Toy for the Rich
A potential $200 billion market might be an understatement. Developed economies have a huge requirement to maintain efficiency and cut costs, if a home battery can save around 25% on the electricity bill by utilizing a simple algorithm to draw power of the grid during off-peak hours and use battery power during peak hours then, users will opt for it. 

And there has been a lot of news of deaths taking place due to power outages. For example, towards the north a storm can take out the power of entire blocks and residents turn to gas heating -- a dangerous situation if ventilation is not taken into consideration.

And in developing economies, areas that are connected to the national grid can experience many hours of power outage. This causes a lot of loss in productivity and again, I have heard of news of infant mortality because, the household did not have power to switch a fan on.
AQuiroga
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AQuiroga,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/3/2015 | 5:02:10 PM
Usage
From a utility standpoint individual consumers without solar systems will not get as good of an advantage (in some areas) as utilities have to keep their pricing the same and reasonable due to regulations restricting how much cost can be built into the rates you pay for your electiricty at home.  Larger companies that have different pricing agreements with the utility can get excellent use out of batteries by storing power during off-peak and using the battery during the peak hours of the day. Pricing between the two time periods can double or even triple per MWh depending on how hot/cold the day is.  

An efficent industrial version would also be a boon for companies who operate certain power plants but do not own them.  Usually they have agreements where they can only turn on the plant 3-4 times a day and must analyze when the most profitable times are to exercise these options.  Making a mistake means lost revenue or even losing money.  The batteries can be a hedge for when the plant is turned on when the demand isn't what was expected.  Also, the batteries can be used to deliver power when all the options for the day have been exercised but a sudden demand is available.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
5/3/2015 | 10:08:35 AM
Re: Toy for the Rich
The electricity auto and accompanied facilities are still expensive instead of something affordable by normal people. So let's see how the progress of this project will be.
Jack N FranF583
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Jack N FranF583,
User Rank: Guru
5/2/2015 | 3:04:18 PM
Re: The Big Question unanswered
Who cares about rooftop solar. Icing on the cake of reliable home/warehouse/factory or Condo, City Regional power-grid. Storing 20% of daily power peaks at windmills, transmission junctions and enough in cities for critical emergency functions at hospitals etc makes sense. Making more smoke does not.

It is a battyery/inverter combo. The best battery with the best inverter. If someone shaves 10% more off the waste/innefficiency of batteries or inverters in the future so much the better. As for getting stuck with another DeLorean, bring it on.
Jack N FranF583
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Jack N FranF583,
User Rank: Guru
5/2/2015 | 2:54:56 PM
Re: Toy for the Rich
Autos are toys for the rich. So What/
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
5/2/2015 | 1:15:19 PM
The Big Question unanswered
I actually viewed the streaming presentation, which started over an hour late. Other than that the batteries were pretty, and come in your choice of colors, I learned very little. The main question was left Completely Unanswered - What kind of efficiency can utilites and solar farms expect? If you put in 1,000 kilowatt hours, how many kilowatt hours will you get back?

I think putting solar panels on residential roofs is silly. You will turn a $4K roof repair into a $20K roof repair, and, because of the various stresses the solar panels will impose, the roof repairs will be required far more often.
KarlQuick
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KarlQuick,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/2/2015 | 1:05:21 PM
Nothing innovative here! ...moving stuck inventory.
Reality.... the mass market for electric cars has not materialized and Tesla has a lot of batteries filling the warehouse.  They need to find some way to unload them.

Tesla 10kwh battery:  $3500 ....needs some way to charge.

Home Depot 11kwh generator: $3000 ....runs 24/7 on natural gas or propane.

A home does not need a small/light battery.  The lithium-ion battery exists not because it is cheap, but because it is small and not heavy.  For home/office use, Tesla's battery offers only the name and eco-glits to recommend it.  Totally a marketing ploy, designed to move stuck inventory.

Note: Tesla and many others are working on small/light fuel cells which will obsolete his batteries.  Another reason why stockpiling them in the warehouse is not really an option.  Their value is shrinking with time.

Googled a bit:  a 10kwh solar panel system to charge Tesla's $3500 battery: $22,000 on Amazon.  Cost of Natural Gas to power the $3000 generator for an hour:  less than $2.  ....still think this is innovative?
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