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When Robots Attack
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2015 | 5:19:55 PM
Re: My favorite bot gladiator: components flew off its opponents
That's one argument for viewing these matches via video. You have to watch robots confined in a plexiglass arena, and plexiglass is optically noticeable -- everything inside looks like it's been processed with a Photoshop filter. On video, the match is much easier to see because camera lenses get to shoot from inside, while the camera operators remain safely outside.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2015 | 5:14:55 PM
My favorite bot gladiator: components flew off its opponents
I attended a robot competition at San Francisco State a few years ago. I'm not sure how it would have done against the flame thrower, but someone had put a projecting, spinning rotary saw blade on a moving platform and it did a lot of damage when it ran into something. It didn't necessarily saw through everything. But components sure flew off its opponents. Was glad for the bullet proof plexiglass between me and them as nuts and bolts flew violently into the cage walls.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
4/7/2015 | 2:31:21 PM
Re: definition
Twitch is a different deal. One in every 55 Twitch viewers is a Twitch broadcaster. It is literally a source of one million content creators.

If you want a professional league with tens of millions in budgets from enterprises you can't rely on crowd-sourced content. Take NASCAR as an example. A feature sponsorship on NASCAR is a $35 million deal. Most NASCAR teams need dozens of sponsors. And they're running technology that has been around for a century.

If you want to learn from the research of something like this, it needs to be done on a big time, scale. And to do that, they eed ot think they get their money back eventually.

Twitch is fine for a medium which is already essentially video. All you are doing is catpuring the stuff and putting commentary over it. This is a whole different deal.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2015 | 2:24:10 PM
Re: definition
>No TV equals no league no matter what it is that you do.

Twitch seems to work fine without TV. With some funding and organization, these hobbyist events could turn into something more polished.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
4/7/2015 | 2:22:25 PM
Re: definition
I don't know. there have been several robot combat TV shows that have tried and failed recently. One was based on the type of fighting in Reel Steel or whatever that Hugh Jackman movie about the ex-boxer turned robot jockey was. Most have found short term success at best.

No TV equals no league no matter what it is that you do.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2015 | 2:20:00 PM
Re: definition
>What we really need is a professional, corporate sponsored robot combat league so that companies with a vested interest can sponsor teams of researchers to improve the state of the art. 

It won't be long.
David Wagner
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50%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
4/7/2015 | 2:18:44 PM
Re: definition
What we really need is a professional, corporate sponsored robot combat league so that companies with a vested interest can sponsor teams of researchers to improve the state of the art. The hobbyist movement is fun, but it will never push the envelope. Auto companies have put money into racing for decades because what they learn on the track goes into their cars. Google, Amazon, and other major investors in robots could apply the lessons to enterprise and (slightly more scarily) defense and security.
Thomas Claburn
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50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2015 | 1:30:07 PM
Re: definition
I think we do need some more specific terms. There's a difference between an electronic toy and a device with software that can learn and a device that can navigate to a power source on its own and recharge itself.


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