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Apple Car: Drive Different
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AidenRenolds
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AidenRenolds,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2015 | 9:16:31 AM
http://www.tyrepowermiami.com.au/contact1
The idea of Apple making a car is interesting to say the least. I think if they got the right people on board to produce a vehicle it could be a pretty impressive piece of machinery. I don't think it is very wise to shut the company down before they can even release their first model. I'd like to see how their car works when they finally release it first before I give an opinion.

nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 5:41:51 AM
Re: Remember how Apple lost it's way after Jobs was ousted?
Apple don't labeled such a product with its name which has been developed by other manufacturers like Google nexus and this is the reason consumer trust their products. So if they would be manufacturing the car in the same fashion than they will be facing challenges especially in mechanical engineering which is not their area of expertise.  On the other hand if they get it from someone else, than the trust will not remain the same.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 5:33:50 AM
Re: Too many specs
By the time the thing hits the market, they would have half the civilized world frothing for one, even though most people have no idea what the specs on the thing are.

This is because the trust of their customers that apple has developed over the decades. One this they have always been consistently delivering is quality. So I would not be amaze if such response is received from the people.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2015 | 10:40:11 AM
Re: Digital DeLorean
@KarlH,

THank you for your comment, and I do share them. Recently a collegue of mine acquired a Hybrid, but she was getting the same milage as my Kia Forte, but it cost her a lot more. So you do bring up a really good point. A Hybrid is suppose to provide above average performance, so it's no surprise consumers are staying away from them if they can bet the same performance on a convential (yet efficient) vehicle.

 

 
Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 10:54:08 PM
Too many specs
Apple ads dont seem to dwell too much on specs, their marketing is riduclously good somehow that they don't need to. I think their ads would be way way more vague. The campaign might start with something under a sheet, a tiny apple logo in the bottom corner, and thats it, for like a year. Then when the sheet comes off, it would reveal an unusually shaped... I guess its a car, but its not like any car I have seen. They would then run that for another year.

By the time the thing hits the market, they would have half the civilized world frothing for one, even though most people have no idea what the specs on the thing are.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
2/23/2015 | 4:54:04 PM
Remember how Apple lost it's way after Jobs was ousted?
Apple was a mess when Jobs returned to the company. The first thing he did was consolidate many overlapping products so it could concentrate on building excellent core products. We're aleady seeing Phablets and mini tablets and, soon, watches (of questionable value). Automobiles require a lot of low tech (transmissions, suspensions, brakes, wheels, bodies) as well as high-tech guts. I think it would be mistake for Apple to venture into the automoitive segment.
KarlH
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KarlH,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/23/2015 | 1:29:30 PM
Re: Digital DeLorean
The Volt's poor acceptance has nothing to do with charging station availability. It runs on gas when the battery supply is low/depleted. It is economics 101. The car was supposed to do 50-75 miles on one charge. In actuality, it gets about 30-40. It was supposed to be under $30K (original target of $25 if I am not mistaken) and it never hit that. My little Saturn ION gets about 29-30 mpg combined and 34-35 on the highway and it originally cost about $17K. So if you got a deal on a Volt at $30K, that is $13K you have to make up in unpurchased fuel. So I drive my Saturn about 15K/year at the combined average of 29 mpg = 517 gallons @ $3.00/gal (avg for last x years) = $1,713. So that would mean you need a minimum of 7.6 years to pay off the difference. It is just a poor return on investment.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 12:48:05 PM
Re: Digital DeLorean
@Gary_EL,

Correct,

I think one approach that automotive companies can do to prove the worth of an all electric vehicle society is perhaps engaging in model community concepts to see how the results go.

Targetting a small town and having everyone drive an electric vehicle (with the assumption that the town would have the structure tu support the vehicles) would definitly lead to a lot of leassons learned
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 12:42:32 PM
Re: Digital DeLorean
It is a chicken-and-egg situation, isn't it? No charging stations until the concept is accepted, and no acceptance until the charging stations are available. Sadly, a negative result of collapsing oil prices is less interest in electric vehicles overall.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 12:37:05 PM
Re: Digital DeLorean
@Gary_EL,

Regarding why the Volt never took off, I think it really has nothing to do with the car itself, but more of the infrastructure of the surrounding environment. Electric Cars require charding stations, and sadly there are only easilly availalbe in metropolitan cities, but in other areas it's still in diapers (if at all).

If a were to purchase an electric vehicle, I would definitly have issues since I haven't seen the first charging stationg anywhere near my recurring commute.

Going forward electric cars will have greater acceptance, once the infrastructure is there to support it.
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