FAA Rules Should Spur Drone Experiments - InformationWeek

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FAA Rules Should Spur Drone Experiments
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SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 2:43:18 PM
Re: Getting down to business
I have yet to see Smart Traffic Lights in my city (I think they are already installing data centres for proper controlling the lights) but I am quite hyped up about the traffic lights working without any supervision. Again, this needs security as a simple hack can cause multiple accidents. 
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 2:40:43 PM
Re: Having a tough job
Priority resolving can be achieved using a First Call First Serves fashion. The drone can be called to an area where there are multiple dropoffs, but then if the packages are not in order the drone follows the normal route and delivers the package at a delay. Therefore customers are warned if they choose the package to be delivered somewhere, there might be a delay.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 2:36:51 PM
Re: FAA Rules Should Spur Drone Experiments
@sachinEE: taht can be a very real situation and needs proper mitigation. I don't trust the drone delivery systems fully, mainly because I haven't still seen a fully functional delivery system. People will get comfortable with this technology once they see it.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 2:21:35 PM
Re: FAA Rules Should Spur Drone Experiments
@impactnow: And who stops drones from being stolen? Should drones be equipped with anti theft tools (like a gun maybe?) and who ensures they wouldn't get hacked and use the tools on normal people?
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2015 | 12:37:50 PM
Re: FAA Rules Should Spur Drone Experiments

That's exactly the concern I have, technology is far from infallible and how do we prevent people from being injured or even killed by a malfunctioning drone. As we can see from the recent drone trip to the white house it would be impossible to stop a drone that is malfunctioning without drastic measures.

SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 1:28:28 PM
Re: FAA Rules Should Spur Drone Experiments
@yalanand: We all know that drones are inevitable, but why not make it safer for people? AI systems are advanced enough to control and monitor drones, but what if that turns on against us? I'm not talking about Terminator-esque situations, I'm talking about what if the AI malfunctions and brings the drone down, suppose on a busy market place?
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 1:26:41 PM
Re: Having a tough job
@yalanand: nice system but again, this can backfire because the drone may not have sky area permissions where the customer wants his/her package delivered. Also it has many other problems like priority resolving. Suppose a customer sets a location where he wants his package delivered at place A and the drone has to deliver 5 more packages at place A but the priority is after dropping the package to the customer the drone is called by another customer who has set the location at place B. This would create much much confusion.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 1:17:24 PM
Re: Getting down to business
@Kelly22: About the IOT driven traffic lights, most cities that are undergoing major change under the canopy of the term "smart city" are using such systems for better and smarter management of rush hour traffic, and also minimizing traffic police and general public casualties in the process.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 1:14:28 PM
Re: Getting down to business
@Kelly22: Yes we do, but not at this level. Drone delivery has had as much as controversy as the trial of creation of an artificial blackhole at CERN. If a technology can kill, then it is up for debate. Moreover this has been under more controversy of late is because the details of this technology is open to the public. 
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
2/23/2015 | 10:58:06 AM
Re: Getting down to business
Exactly. Granted, it would be best to not have to worry about a drone killing anyone and avoiding a lawsuit completely... but these are risks we have to consider when talking about new technologies like that.
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