FCC: Stop Blocking Personal WiFi - InformationWeek

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FCC: Stop Blocking Personal WiFi
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vtompkins105
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vtompkins105,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/29/2015 | 12:25:46 PM
Re: Unintentional vs. intentinal interference
@Curt Franklin As one licensed Ham/Amateur Radio operator to another that you would agree with the FCC.

 

@Charlie Babcock If they are passively listening then the FCC has no issue with them. If on the other hand they are doing a MitM operation then that could fall under the malicious interference issue. Since they would also be interfacing with the network then a death packet could be used to remove them from the network.

 

@Curt Franklin As for people learning to protect themselves they are still under the illusion that computers are appliances and need no maintenance "They just work." Though that is a topic for another time.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2015 | 10:48:30 PM
Re: Hot Air
@asksqn,

Doesn't that seem like a conflict of intereset. But then again, who better than someone in the communications industry to be the chair?
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/28/2015 | 9:43:41 PM
Re: Cracking down on blocking, how about snooping?
@Charlie, your question echoes one I've heard several network security specialists ask. They point out that "man in the middle" attacks are quite possible in public WiFi areas and that the venues (like hotels and conference centers) should be able to shut down all unauthorized hotspots in order to protect their legitimate users from such attacks.

I agree that MitM attacks are real, but I still think that intentional interference is the wrong response. Users need to learn to protect themselves -- and protection against MitM attacks should be part of the road-warriors toolkit.
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/28/2015 | 9:40:32 PM
Re: Unintentional vs. intentinal interference
@ProfTheory, anything remotely like "intentional interference" isn't allowed in the US. The FCC's decision seems to be a clarification that this interference can be at essentially any network layer and still be considered unlawful. I tend to agree with the FCC's decision here -- though I'm going to comment to a note by Charlie Babcock in just a moment and talk about "the rest of the story."
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
1/28/2015 | 7:32:59 PM
Cracking down on blocking, how about snooping?
How do you distinguish the WiFi hotspot user from the WiFi snooper, who wants to capture your log in name and password and email contacts as you stay in a hotel, either here or abroad? 
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2015 | 6:48:53 PM
Hot Air
None of the wifi jammers -particularly the internet service providers- will be too worked up about the latest hot hair coming from the FCC.  This is the same agency whose chair is owned/operated/controlled by Comcast.  And what Comcast wants, Comcast gets as evidenced by the net neutrality issue.  
ProfTheory
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ProfTheory,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2015 | 5:49:18 PM
Unintentional vs. intentinal interference
"so deauthentication done for the purpose of load balancing appears to be acceptable."

 

Actually it isn't since the death would be intentionally sent to a station not assigned to their network. Since these are part 15 devices they must accept any and all interference meaning you can't get rid of them just because they are having an impact on your network performance. Just ask Curtis Franklin KG4GWA.


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