4 Education Technology Trends To Watch - InformationWeek

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4 Education Technology Trends To Watch
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Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/26/2015 | 1:13:38 PM
Re: Retaining capacity
@SachinEE, you won't catch me discounting the importance of reading but the fact is that there are many different literacies that a person must have to function in western society and it's time we spent time recognizing and cultivating those literacies.

I'm not talking about things like "emotional literacy" (though, to be honest, that's important, too) but audio, video, and graphical literacy. My generation was the first to have television used as a formal learning tool; I'm amazed at how much more literate young people are in terms of moving image contstruction and understanding than am I.

For me, the most exciting thing about the new technologies is that they allow students the opportunity to learn in the way that works best for them, whether it be listening, reading, watching a demo, or hands-on experience. "One size fits all" doesn't -- especially when it comes to education.
BradKrug
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BradKrug,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2015 | 2:29:50 PM
Channels vs teaching techology
I'm rather new to the technology in the classroom debate but have been in technology for over 20.  I find this debate interesting since we seem to spend more time on talking about delivery of content (the channel) than talking about what kids need to understand about technology so they can make good decisions concerning when a technology should or should not be used.

There are times when a technology makes a lot of sense to use such as spell checking.  However as one uses this technology it also has an impact on how one writes.  I have found that as I learn a new language, French, and respond to question when using Duolingo, I many times miss type words thus getting responds wrong.

I believe schools need to spend more time teaching about what technology is, the pros and cons in different situations and even the moral issues concerning technologies and less time using the newest channels or widget.  The channels and widgets will continue to change and schools can't afford to keep up with the latest and greatest widget but they can address the what, when and why questions cost effectively.

 
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
1/23/2015 | 10:14:30 AM
Re: Effectiveness and Competition with Gamification
I spent a few months covering education tech, and gamification and blended learning were both hot topics. Glad to see these trends are still growing. Gamification has huge potential to help kids become more engaged with what they're learning and collaborate with one another. Sure, it may involve competition, but I think some competition is a positive thing. After all, kids play competitive sports. What's wrong with a bit of competition in the classroom?
mherger
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mherger,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2015 | 1:05:33 AM
Effectiveness and Competition with Gamification
Gamification is already a very proven education tool, as many many examples show. We collected many examples on our Enterprise Gamification Wiki


Also competition, which is just one of nearly 200 game design elements, can be problematic in a learning environment. Gamification is not at all about competition, but as mentioned before, can also be cooperation.


And finally, how effective is it? Indeed, with traditional classroom settings, only 10% of the taught material is retained by the learner. If you use visuals, sounds, appeal to more senses, and use gamification, 30-40% are retained. But if you create an immersive experience, such as instead of learning the facts about the French revolution, but experiencing it through let's say role play through a character, up to 90%(!) of the taught material retain with the student.

I write about all these things in my book Enterprise Gamification - Engaging People By Letting Them Have Fun
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
1/22/2015 | 11:04:29 PM
Re: Retaining capacity
@molly, the one concern people might have about gamification in classrooms is that it would stoke the dark side of competitiveness. But gamification can be designed to encourage cooperation and teamwork. And I suppose it can be even designed like a game of T-ball, where everybody wins. On the other hand, perhaps having winners and losers isn;t a bad thing (since that's life, as Sinatra might say).
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
1/22/2015 | 9:59:57 PM
Re: Retaining capacity
Implementing a STEM program that is thorough and efficient can be lots of fun. Unfortunately strict pacing calendars, gathering assessment data, gathering work for the bulletin boards and portfolios and the beaucratice red tape placed on teachers this is not always easily implemented. Teachers are faced with adhering to the strict guidelines of the commone core through the use of common core aligned textbooks, it leaves little time for creativity, flexibility, and learning through fun and innovative ways such as STEM infused activities. The test obsessed system is sadly constructed around teaching to the test on a consistent basis, especially since teachers are not largely evaluated by their student's scores. I think schools that participate in STEM and project based learning can really be a valuable learning experience for students. I think that The educational trends that you mentioned in the article can create positive learning experiences, increase student engagement, and steer more girls into possibly pursuing fields in science, technology, engineering, and math. If teachers are not supported in being able to take time to facilitate such technological trends, than they should at least be able to do so in after school programs or clubs. I think it can really benefit the children and enhance their learning.
MollyW049
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MollyW049,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/22/2015 | 2:18:34 PM
Re: Retaining capacity
I completely agree, the use of games in the classroom in order to allow students to grasp a concept more fully is a brilliant use of our time and money. Not all children can reach their full potential listening to a lecture. I'm not a huge fan of video games (for my own personal reasons) however when used for educational purposes it allows children who may have a hard time concentrating or who need their hands to be busy along with their ears and their eyes to focus on the task in front of them. I hope futher advances are made and this form of education continues to be apart of the classroom.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
1/22/2015 | 1:05:54 PM
Retaining capacity
Let's be honest: books are important, however, students can get a grasp of the topic and retain it in their memory better if the topic is presented in the form of pictures and sound, maybe a video and maybe virtual reality. 


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