Enterprise Drones: What CIOs Should Know - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Comments
Enterprise Drones: What CIOs Should Know
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Curt Franklin
50%
50%
Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/18/2015 | 2:25:08 PM
Re: Needed: federal Department of Hovering Vehicles
@Charlie, you absolutely nail the point of the conundrum, here. On the other hand, I hope I'll be excused if I express limited enthusiasm for Yet Another Federal Department.
Curt Franklin
50%
50%
Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/18/2015 | 2:23:39 PM
Re: Not just FAA regulations...
@D Lowery, thanks for adding that to the conversation! I had no idea that the information recorded on a drone's on-board camera might be considered a CCTV system -- though I suppose it would get even more confusing if you separated the video captured to the on-board camera from the video streamed to an FPV monitor in the operator's hands. Hmmmmmm...

This is, indeed, one of many areas in which the weight of our bureaucracy works against innovation in the US. At this point, I'm just hoping that the FAA releases a reasonable set of regulations later this year, though I'm not going to hold my breath.
Curt Franklin
50%
50%
Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/18/2015 | 2:16:13 PM
Re: liability
@Tom, the liability issues are already looking interesting. When I talk with the major drone vendors about how they can display their products at trade shows (like CES), guidance from their insurance carrier (and quite often, their legal department) comes up very quickly.

I would almost quibble, though, with the use of "AI" to describe what's going on in the flight control systems. Yes, they're taking input from sensors and responding more quickly than most humans can. Anyone who doesn't believe that should just try flying a quad-copter with the stabilization system disengaged to see how the difficulty goes up. In general, though, they aren't making decisions on where the craft goes or what it does in its flight. Those parameters are given to the system by the "pilot."

Of course, even stabilization systems fail -- I've seen more than one quad-copter head for the horizon despite input from the operator and its own safety systems. Where the liability lies if one of those run-away drones lands on someone's head has yet to be determined in court.
Curt Franklin
50%
50%
Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/18/2015 | 2:07:50 PM
Re: Long distance inspections
@Chris, you're right that was the first approval and it's part of the problem for current drone regulations. The BP drone project uses a fixed-wing drone with a 9.2 foot wingspan. The FAA currently assumes that 18-inch, 2 pound quadcopters should be regulated in exactly the same way. If the final regs don't make a distinction (many countries draw the line at around 5 pounds of total craft weight) then there are going to be enormous problems down the line.
Charlie Babcock
100%
0%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
1/16/2015 | 6:07:25 PM
Needed: federal Department of Hovering Vehicles
Drones actually call for regulation and supervision somewhere between the airborne FAA and land-based Department of Motor Vehicles. Perhaps a federal Department of Hovering Vehicles, covering airspace up to 400 feet?
Thomas Claburn
100%
0%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
1/16/2015 | 12:18:10 PM
liability
This liability issues for these drones will be interesting, particularly once it becomes apparent there's lots of AI involved in automatic stabilization. Sooner or later one of these things is going to kill someone (unintentionally) or cause an accident.
ChrisMurphy
50%
50%
ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
1/16/2015 | 11:41:26 AM
Long distance inspections
BP has the first FAA approved commercial drone use, for use in the Alaskan oil fields:  

FAA Approves First Commercial Drone Flight Over Land ...


The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

Slideshows
11 Things IT Professionals Wish They Knew Earlier in Their Careers
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  4/6/2021
News
Time to Shift Your Job Search Out of Neutral
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  3/31/2021
Commentary
Does Identity Hinder Hybrid-Cloud and Multi-Cloud Adoption?
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  4/1/2021
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Successful Strategies for Digital Transformation
Download this report to learn about the latest technologies and best practices or ensuring a successful transition from outdated business transformation tactics.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll