3 Tips For Minding The IT Skills Gap - InformationWeek

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3 Tips For Minding The IT Skills Gap
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SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
1/19/2015 | 1:27:32 PM
Re: Point #2 is an important one
@SaneIT: All the same. A training under the canopy of a company really helps a lot, especially for the freshers. Moreover there can be tests conducted on a regular basis to know exactly who needs training and who doesn't.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
1/19/2015 | 1:20:32 PM
Re: Measuring ambition
@kstaron: Having spend a fair amount of time in my company's interview board I can tell you that ambition (or the show of it) leaks out from the candidate through the various questions an interviewer asks. Most interviewers prefer to know something from the candidate that is not the well rehearsed "where do you want to see yourself in 5 years" question's answer. Most candidates speak their minds through spontaniety and this spontaneity is very importnat for the interviewers to make a decision on the candidate.
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
1/17/2015 | 10:44:29 AM
Measuring ambition
As a person with a background in training I whole-heartedly agree that developing in house talent with training is a win-win for the company. I always jumped at a chance to learn something new as part of my job. And allowing employess to expand their skills can often help keep their work exciting.  

How do you assess soft skills like ambition during the interview process? Communication and even leadership should be evident in the resume and even during the interview, but how do you measure a person's ambition? By their enthusiasm? By their rehearsed answer to where do you want to be in 5 years? 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
1/15/2015 | 8:17:36 AM
Re: Point #2 is an important one
I think in some instances our microwave world has made us forget that people are capable of learning new skills.  I know that I would much rather train someone up from my team to take a higher level position and back fill the lower level position than try to find someone who will fit into our team at a higher level.  Once someone has established themselves and you know how they work, what motivates them and what they are capable of it's much less risky to move them up than to hope the person sitting across from you at an interview isn't just telling you all the things you want to hear.  I also think it builds team morale, knowing that if a position opens up that they have a chance to grow makes them want to work on new skills.  If you keep hiring from the outside then people stop trying and they just settle into the box you've locked them into.
Alan85
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Alan85,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/15/2015 | 1:37:58 AM
Re: Point #2 is an important one
I think the above three are valuable tips for minding the IT Skills gap. It helps in developing industry specific information technology skills for employees to excel ahead in their fields. Thanks for the post for all readers.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
1/14/2015 | 5:25:37 PM
Re: Point #2 is an important one
I agree that companies would be better off educating current employees than searching for new ones. Not only will the organizations benefit from having workers familiar with their data, but I'm sure that employees will be more loyal to businesses that support their career development.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2015 | 4:22:13 PM
Point #2 is an important one
Developing the talent you have is a hugely important point. People want career development and need a path to growth. Big data and analytics, for example, is an area where companies often think they have to go out there and find "data scientists," but I've seen many cases where data-management types are simply recasting themselves with new titles. Data-management talent is hard enough to come by and new platforms like Hadoop and NoSQL aren't rocket science. Maybe if you're getting into a very technical area requiring real expertise, like advanced analytics and prediction, you'll want to seek out new talent. But first and foremost, find ways to make the most of the talent you already have in place. These people understand your data and your business, and that's half the battle.
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