Samsung Ponders Move To Windows Phone - InformationWeek

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Samsung Ponders Move To Windows Phone
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fordfiveohh
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fordfiveohh,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/7/2015 | 12:02:27 PM
Re: Would not be a good move for Samsung
Not responding is not a reflection on Microsoft. Not responding simply means that the user interface is on the same thread as the task it invoked. Because of this the form cannot respond because the operating system cant give resources because of two things : 1 your computer was slow enough to allow this to occur 2 the developer did not create a thread and callback for the long running task that froze the UI. This is either because your computer is too slow and or bad programming of that app. It has nothing to do with Microsoft.
RickP034
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RickP034,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/14/2015 | 10:55:45 PM
Would not be a good move for Samsung
After using Microsoft products for years and dealing with their continued unstable operating systems, crashing machines and "not responding" messages when trying to do simple tasks, it was an absolute joy to be able to use Samsung Android phones and tablets to do the same tasks without the forever constant restarting and rebooting. Why anyone would want to purchase a Windows phone is beyond me.  And, Tizen ISN'T dead by any means, making me wonder about the possible bias in this article.  Samsung has been very active recently developing that OS for all of their other non-phone products, but, yes, they are behind in terms of a phone application. Nonetheless, whoever has the deepest pockets for app development incentives will determine the future products we use.  Microsoft has been shoving their crappy systems down our throats for years only because of their deep pocket influence.  It's not because they have a wonderful, quality product. 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2015 | 3:18:07 PM
Re: Stay with Android
Agreed, a complete switch would not be in order, because Samsung has only experienced one season of sales lower than expectations with their SG5 -- they will have to be at least 5 or 6 additional bad seasons before Samsung completely switches over from Android. 

That is why I feel that it will be a launch similar to the Tizen launch -- a complementary solution offered to the market and next, the market will decide if it has demand for it.

There are two reasons behind the assumption that they might be demand for a Samsung-Microsoft combo. First, like you said, a phone that can dock to a docking station might be in high demand in developed economies and Microsoft would be the best partner, because it has demonstrated that it sees the potential for a mobile/desktop solution with their Surface line. And second, it is easier to sell Windows in developing economies because of user familiarity.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2015 | 3:16:06 PM
Re: All about the ecosystem
I'm definitely in support of a partnership that benefits consumers in the way of more choices, more flexibility and lower costs. Whether or not that will be the case remains to be seen as this plays out.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2015 | 2:53:32 PM
Re: All about the ecosystem
Well said @jagibbons, as long as consumers end up benefiting from a friendship then, the friendship can stand. I feel that there is a large number of consumers that would welcome a Samsung-Microsoft combo because they would like to have a unified ecosystem will full functionality on all platforms. Are consumers willing to pay a premium for such an environment? I guess not, because the Samsung-Google combo has already shown consumers that there is no need for a premium to be in place and that they are alternatives available to fund an OS.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
1/13/2015 | 8:39:52 PM
Re: Stay with Android
If Samsung were to entirely switch to Windows Phone (not likely)

What would stop Samsung to offer phones with both Windows and Android?
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
1/13/2015 | 3:47:12 PM
Barn Doors already open.
Over eight years (two year carrier contracts) I've had a "windows" phone from HP, HTC, LG, and Samsung.  I kept buying into the "new and improved" marketing with every new release but each was terrible to use for anything particularly to make a phone call from contacts.  When Samsung offered the Galaxy Nexus I was ready and never looked back followed by the S3 and now the Note 4 each better than the last which wasn't the case for Windows Mobile/Phone.  The latest Windows Phones are competitive with all the major developers providing aps but me and many millions of others plan to never go back to a Windows Phone after experiencing eight years of hellish products.  If I were Samsung I'd tell Microsoft to go take a hike if they are not going to dismiss the past licensing claims AND pay for Samsung's R&D cost to develope a Windows Phone.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
1/13/2015 | 2:56:58 PM
Re: All about the ecosystem
I actually think Tizen would be a better strategy than Windows Phone particularly if MS insists on getting its $1Billion licensing from Samsung.  Microsoft needs Samsung more than Samsung needs Microsoft.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
1/13/2015 | 1:57:49 PM
Re: All about the ecosystem
Why would Microsoft be considered the "dark side"?  Is Microsoft really in the same "evil empire" position as they once were a decade ago?
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
1/13/2015 | 12:52:09 PM
Re: All about the ecosystem
Yes, it would be a boon for Microsoft, but probably only for one buying cycle unless there are a growing number of loyal Windows Phone buyers who come back for more every 18-24 months.
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