Samsung Galaxy S5 Sales Tank, CEO In Glare - InformationWeek

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Samsung Galaxy S5 Sales Tank, CEO In Glare
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Nemos
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50%
Nemos,
User Rank: Strategist
11/30/2014 | 5:35:42 AM
Apple as a fashion
"The company is sitting on stockpiles of unsold smartphones" 

I believe that is happening as a result of two things:First, because Samsung as you mentioned is not soclosely connected with the android platform (a huge mistake especially now). Second and the most important you can't compete Apple by having almost the same price (as Apple is fashion ). 

 

 
Brian.Dean
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50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
11/26/2014 | 1:56:24 AM
Re: buying and using issues
Migrating from one phone to another would also cost a user indirectly. For example, apps need to be reinstalled through Google sync, data and important SMS would need to be transferred and getting used to the new phone would take some time. These are all costs that would add to the phone's price and carrier costs that the consumer would be putting into their equation.  
Brian.Dean
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50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
11/26/2014 | 1:46:39 AM
Re: Interesting
Good point about the life cycle of a smart phone. I also think that a year would be too short to consider it as a life cycle for a smart phone. The only scenario under which I would imagine that a consumer is operating in a yearly cycle is if a generational upgrade takes place -- the GS5 was not a generational upgrade to the GS4, it was just a marginal upgrade.
impactnow
50%
50%
impactnow,
User Rank: Author
11/25/2014 | 12:19:06 PM
buying and using issues
Having 40+ phones does not make a lot of sense the choices for consumers would be very difficult at best . When the process to actually change carriers and acquire phone is factored in it is even more complicated . I recently tried to upgrade to another carrier the process was so complicated and convoluted I gave up. If Samsung wants to sell more phones they need to make the process to acquire them easier and work with the carriers to do so .
redsoxers
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50%
redsoxers,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/24/2014 | 6:24:21 PM
Re: Interesting
Apple changed the connection cable once in their history. 
Stratustician
100%
0%
Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
11/24/2014 | 2:56:57 PM
Re: Interesting
I think it's still a bit of a strange thing to keep expecting large shipments of phones considering the buying cycle.  The average smartphone user probably has at least a 2 year contract (in some cases, especially here in Canada some still have 3 years) which means it's impossible to think everyone will be getting a new device on a yearly basis.  This is especially the case when the phones themselves still don't age as much as we saw during the first few years of Android adoption.  Would I love to upgrade my Android device, sure! But does that mean that i am going to buy out a contract and procure a new phone? Definitely not.  So I don't understand why they imagine the market is going to change so much that we will see a large adoption of new model devices despite the quick lifecycle of current devices.  Sales can't keep up a trend of huge sales now that there are more devices to choose from and we are seeing longer use terms due to the overall cost of them.
TerryB
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50%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
11/24/2014 | 12:49:19 PM
Interesting
Most of Android users here are Galaxy users, beginning back with the II. Nobody is really disillusioned with that phone, when it breaks/wears out they get whatever model is out then. We have several S5 users, they seem very happy with it.

It is somewhat irritating they keep tweaking size just enough you can't use same case as last model. What a racket that is. Not that Apple any better, they just mess with connectors.


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