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FCC Should Stop Coddling Broadcasters
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Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
11/3/2014 | 3:02:05 PM
Re: Eminent Domain: A No Brianer
@wt_hayes    Ah I see.  And now that you mention it - it does make cents ( no misspell )  that the FCC would charge something.   I wonder if it is a flat rate or based on a percentage of revenue gain from use ?

 

I bet I know which one is in effect.
wt_hayes
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wt_hayes,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2014 | 3:01:12 PM
Re: The FCC: A Study In Futility
You realize that the law that all of this is operating under requires that the FCC complete the spectrum reallocation by the end of 2022 and requires that broadcasters that choose to remain in the business of broadcasting be made whole which means protecting the audiences they serve. Since we will live with whatever the results are of this process, it is vital for all concerned parties that it be done correctly. A number of very real flaws have been discovered in the FCC's methodology for channel assignments and those flaws have to be dealt with before proceeding down the road. The delay you are referencing is 6 to 9 months and in no way pushes up against the 2022 mandated deadline. I'd rather see the FCC get it right then cut corners. And if freeing up the 600 MHz of spectrum is such a huge concern, I'd suggest doing some analysis on the 700 MHz that was freed up in the DTV conversion, much of it still unutilized.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
11/3/2014 | 2:58:56 PM
Re: Band Width Throttling: Truth or Dare ?
What's remarkable is that despite material consequences for the end user, such as throttling, there still isn't adequate public pressure to make inroads, as both you and Lorna point out. Then again, one wonders how profound the public pressure would have to become in order to make inroads.
wt_hayes
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wt_hayes,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2014 | 2:52:42 PM
Re: Flawed Analogies
The additional services that broadcaster can now provide were made possible by the DTV conversion. Prior to that the analog channel standard could only support a single stream of content. DTV has opened up the work of over the air multicasting that allows broadcasters to provide (at no charge) many additional services. In a market where there were say 12 analog channels, there are now 12 digital channel offering multicasts so the viewers see 36 separate program streams. Everything from channels dedicated to local news and weather to music video channels, how-to channels, kids channels, business channels and classic television and movie channels. The next generation broadcast standard (ATSC 3.0) is being designed to add even more capabilities to the service offerings of broadcasters and again, at no charge.

I just don't believe that free television necessarily has to be sacraficed to make room for new and as yet undefined wireless services many of which appear to mimic broadcast services with the exception that the celluar service providers will be the gate keepers and the consumers will have to pay for every byte of data to receive content that can be delivered for free through broadcast. 
wt_hayes
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wt_hayes,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2014 | 2:41:15 PM
Re: Eminent Domain: A No Brianer
Commercial broadcasters do pay a spectrum utilization fee to the FCC every year for every license they hold. It has been that way for quite some time. 
wt_hayes
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wt_hayes,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2014 | 2:37:36 PM
Re: Can Someone Please Tell Me.....
Digital television is still transmitted over the air using the same channels/spectrum that analog television used. If you have an antenna, these channels and all of their services are available with no subscription fee. If you choose to pay a provider like cable, you don't need an antenna but you do have to pay the monthly fee. If you choose satellite, you substitute a satellite antenna for a television television antenna and have to pay the subscription fee. Additionally the satellite providers don't offer all of the services that are carried on the local broadcast channel.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
11/3/2014 | 2:14:29 PM
Re: The FCC: A Study In Futility
@Techno - It is true also that the FCC has only so much staff. The Net Neutrality issue is hotly contested right now -- and, it's also important to consumers. However, I think 2016 is just too long to wait. 
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
11/3/2014 | 2:01:59 PM
Re: The FCC: A Study In Futility
@Lorna  Good point. This is an opportunity to get it right this time. I want to believe in the FCC, it is difficult to keep up with them because their head is constantly changing and I do believe they are influenced politically which makes the issue all the more difficult.

But I will try to remain positive about this even though I really have little to go on in that regard, let's hope the FCC does the right thing for once.

This has riled me up so much I plan to do my part with my congress person and I am not affraid of sending an email to the FCC.

But you point is well taken, collective pressure is the only way to make government officials stand up, listen and act.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
11/3/2014 | 1:53:03 PM
Re: Flawed Analogies
 ."...The motivation appears more based on greed than service to the public."

 

@wt_hayes    It certainly does and I would argue it always has been.  And while I understand your point, there are numerous channels lying unused with content when you scan now but where were these channels before that ?   

And is this content really worth the billions broadcasters made from making it and serving it on channels that few could find prior to this digital move ?

I don't think so.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
11/3/2014 | 1:50:11 PM
Re: The FCC: A Study In Futility
@Technocrati, Yes, there is no doubt that the original bargain has long since stopped paying off for consumers. However, until consumers wake up and make a fuss, little will happen to change the status quo.

I'd also argue that it's just as important to be smart & creative in how we reallocate. Let's not end up back here in 10 or 15 years as IoT (or some tech we don't know about yet) is being squeezed.
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