Crowdsourcing Helps Patients, Doctors Speak The Same Language - InformationWeek

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Crowdsourcing Helps Patients, Doctors Speak The Same Language
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Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
11/3/2014 | 10:39:01 AM
Re: Possible win-win
It could -- although I don't think hospitals should rely solely on software for translation services. Doctors and nurses still lean primarily on in-room interpreters because that's what they're accustomed to using, the experts I interviewed said. And while phone, video, or web tools are useful for some things -- post-release care, for example -- I hope healthcare never loses the empathy of including a real, live breathing human interpreter when notifying family members of a fatal prognosis, long-term complex condition of a child, or other unwelcome news. Can you imagine hearing that news via your smartphone or a laptop's speakers? No, neither can I. 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
11/2/2014 | 9:50:28 PM
Re: Possible win-win
It's very important for doctor and patience to speak the same language. Otherwise the powerful interpretting method is needed. In addiiton to crowdsourcing, I am thinking if Natrual Language Processing (NLP) can play an important role in the near future?
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
10/31/2014 | 4:56:52 PM
Re: Possible win-win
The rates vary, depending in part on the rarity of the language the translator speaks. So people who speak Spanish are in less demand than those who speak some of the native Latin American dialects one of the executives mentioned to me. But yes, it's exciting that new opportunities are opening up for people to work remotely!
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2014 | 2:57:21 PM
Possible win-win
This could be a win-win for translators and hospitals and the patients. Of course I'm hoping the interpreters are getting more per minute than their on site counterpart, since the whole purpose of a two hour minimum is to offset the time it takes to drive there and back as well as to find the next assignment. Unless the need for translators vastly outnumbers the amount of certified bilingual people, a person may not be able to make a living on by-the-minute translation. I always enjoy technology that let's people telecommute where they couldn't before.


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