Dear Elon Musk: AI Demon Not Scariest - InformationWeek

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Dear Elon Musk: AI Demon Not Scariest
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Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2014 | 1:06:08 PM
Intelligence without emotion
While I agree that I think there are more immediate threats than AI, there are potential issues with it, like its intrisic lack of emotion. While theoretically, 'intelligence' for want of a better word, feels like it could be programmed based around logic. That's how a large portion of our brains work. But the emotional part which is very much linked to how we think could surely never be programmed without the use of organic material, or at least, an artificially created version of things like hormones.

And without emotion, you have psychopaths. Even if we can't create AI like that, what happens when someone develops a method to upload their conciousness into a machine? Again, devoid of emotion. 

That's what worries me about AI. It's inherrant lack of empathy. 
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
10/29/2014 | 6:31:02 PM
Re: Intelligence without emotion
> there are potential issues with it, like its intrisic lack of emotion. 

I don't know that it's trust simulated emotion to do the right thing any more than I'd trust its absence. There's a reason the DoD requires that all robotic weapon systems depend on humans to trigger weapons.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2014 | 5:33:37 AM
Re: Intelligence without emotion
Agreed. Similarly I think we're going to need humans with controls in automated cars for some time to come, as handling the moral choice of potentially saving livess by taking others isn't something I feel comfortable with an AI deciding just yet. 
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
10/29/2014 | 4:59:10 PM
Drive to survive is biological, not electro-mechanical
Nice column, especially the list of things we should be worrying about. Elon Musk has heard the phrase "machine learning" once too often and is way too invested in it. The main way that computers are more "intelligent" than humans is in their ability to amass and perform algorithmic functions on masses of data. They would need a drive to survive on their own, the force behind most of what human intelligence does, to start thinking for themselves. That drive appears to be based much more in biological than electro-mechanical evolution. I'm more worried about what Google driverless cars might do to us than AI.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
10/29/2014 | 6:12:30 PM
Strange hyperbole
So odd that he used all this Biblical imagery, as though to project onto machines not only intelligence, but also consciousness, intentionality, desire and all kinds of other attributes. I worry more about so-called intelligence that we trust too much and that comes back to bite us-- more the sort of oversight or tunnel-vision that Thomas discusses here. I'm not as worried about the machines trying to rebel, or challenging our notion or personhood, or whatever Musk was getting at.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2014 | 12:49:06 AM
Demons
It's an apt analogy because our understanding of intelligence is about as strong as our understanding of demons: We don't really understand either.

I believe in the 21st century, (artificial) intelligence and demons don't belong in the same paragraph.

I'm pretty sure an Atheist or a Buddhist can explain demons without much difficulty.

Mr Musk is being paranoid. If we don't deal with the problems that the Earth and the people are facing right now (demons/devil), by the time AI is able to control humans, there won't be any to control.
hachre
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hachre,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/31/2014 | 10:09:36 AM
Really???
Since when do we consider a single if statement to be an AI?
jarekf
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jarekf,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/31/2014 | 3:24:54 PM
AI is inevitable
AI is coming and there is practically nothing we can do about it. It may happen in 30 or 100 years, but it is inevitable. The reason is very simple: our progress is based on increasing the processing power (faster computers, more memory etc), and that is exactly what advanced AI needs to exist: processing power and fast access to data. The only way to stop AI would be to stop improving computers (which is practically impossible).

I am not worried about AI created for research purposes in some institutions (where it can be contained). I am talking about the time, when every home PC has more processing power than the human brain. With that, someone, somewhere will come up with an idea how to create it in a way that can't be controlled.

There is a lot of confusion about what kind of AI we are talking about. I am talking about a software which can efficiently improve itself (which can rewrite its own code). As simple as that. When that happens, there is nothing to stop it.


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