Microsoft Wants to Kill Email Attachments - InformationWeek

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Microsoft Wants to Kill Email Attachments
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the5thHorseman
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the5thHorseman,
User Rank: Strategist
10/9/2014 | 1:01:35 PM
"New" ideas?

First, I'd like to say that I don't envy Mr. Nadella... He inherited a company that Balmer made about as agile as IBM was when it built computers... it took them roughly a year to send an empty box. Microsoft is so far behind and has so many broken products that I really believed they had about two years left in them before they got bought by the Chinese. I am truly impressed with the turnaround in the company thus far, and how quickly Mr. Nadella has effected change. He is wise to focus on web and mobile apps first; you can develop and release these in a fraction of the time it takes to write for Windows. I say he is wise because if he doesn't get SOMETHING positive out there in a big hurry, they won't survive. So I see them embracing the existing world now, very new to them since they've been sleeping for the past ten years. Although they are getting on the right track, releasing a new gadget or gizmo every two weeks isn't going to save them from their legacy. Microsoft has a LOT of sins to atone for; Windows Vista, 7 (to a lesser degree), 8, 8.1, expiring XP, KNOWING that corporate users relied on it to run their custom legacy software that cannot run on Vista and up... one could go on all day. You really need to consider Microsoft's position in the world, and how much the world depends on their products. Entire countries use their operating systems, databases, office products, management tools, etc. Governments, corporations, infrastructure... all relying on Microsoft products. I appreciate their "Web and mobile first" ideology; I understand it and why. But right now, entire foreign governments are dumping Windows, and anything that says Microsoft on it, including Germany, France, Russia, multiple African and South American nations... A lot of people saying NO. There is a loss of confidence in their products and in their ability to compete or even support their existing products. I'm a systems administrator, and I can say from experience that releasing a new server version (2012) with a tablet interface did not impress anyone that I know. The point is that while Mr. Nadella wants to move on and start catching up, he can't ignore the world wide mess his company has left strewn across the planet. If he wants to restore confidence and trust, he is going to have address their support, generally considered to be expensive, and poor, to be kind, and the absolutely nonsensical and absurd licensing models they have relied on to suck as much money out of existing customers as they can, to offset losses due to abandonment of their products. If Microsoft is going to survive, they need to fix their broken products, get back on the leading edge, simplify their licensing, improve their support, publicly address the security issues presented by Eric Snowden, and regain the trust of their customers. A good way to start would probably be the licensing overhaul. This single ripoff scheme is the number one reason for us avoiding their products at all cost. I work for an educational institution, and have been lobbying for years to get off Microsoft products. It's much easier for me now, I just explain the licensing "model" to management and administration and they run away screaming. Thanks for making it easy to drop your products Microsoft... I don't envy Mr. Nadella... but if he can fix Microsoft, he'll have a high speed rail ticket to the CEO hall of fame... Good luck sir...

billguy@cornerstoneintl.com
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[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
10/9/2014 | 12:24:49 PM
Restriction on number of files uploaded to the cloud
A so-called Authorized MS Small Business Specialist has told me that I have too many files for all of them to be uploaded to the cloud.

I have a relatively small one-person company that I have run for 20 years.   Consequently, I have a lot of files for a small company, but I cannot believe the number of my files comes even close to larger companies with hundreds of thousands of files.

If the medium-size to larger-size companies can place all of their files on the cloud, why can't I?

 

William Guy

[email protected]
MemphisITDude
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MemphisITDude,
User Rank: Strategist
10/9/2014 | 10:33:47 AM
... and I want a solid gold toilet seat, but it's not going to happen.
Email attachments will never die, as they are too convenient for auditing, archiving, and slow/nonexistent Internet connections. Not to mention you can share (via forward) with people outside your directory. All that said, I've been very impressed with the browser versions of Word and Excel for light document editing. It's almost like you're using the "real" Excel, although from a developer perspective I shudder to think of all the JavaScript gyrations that must be going on underneath the surface. Maybe these native apps will be Microsoft's advantage over Google, DropBox, and other online file sharing services.

 
dan.in.it
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dan.in.it,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/9/2014 | 10:18:18 AM
Welcome to the party
I am surprised that the author is positioning this like Microsoft is trying to change the paradigm on this, when this has been available with Google Apps and Drive for a while now.  Nice of Microsoft to catch up.  
xmatman01
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xmatman01,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/9/2014 | 9:37:37 AM
Microsoft Wants to Kill Email Attachments
That's a pretty poor excuse to grow their Cloud Service.
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