9 Innovative Products: Designers Of Things Conference - InformationWeek

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9 Innovative Products: Designers Of Things Conference
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Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2014 | 1:15:34 PM
Computerized products without the computer
While I love the idea of these new devices and what they can do, I sometimes still ask if we need all these connected devices.  On one hand, yes, having the ability to use your phone as a computer interface for these devices is a great way to not only produce gadgets that offer additional functionality when tethered, the other side of me has to ask if we are just building extra peripherals in a way that doesn't actually add much value except in certain cases such as those with real world applications for science etc.  Soon we'll need to carry an extra bag just for the phone add-ons!
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
9/24/2014 | 2:48:48 PM
Re: Computerized products without the computer
At the MediFuture conference (which I wrote about here), someone asked the maker of a connected device for managing diabetes why it didn't connect to the individual's smartphone. Answer: by giving the device it's own cellular connectivity, the manufacturer (Livongo) made it function independent of a smartphone. So it works even if your phone's battery dies or whatever.

In this case, the usage scenario was to send medical monitoring data back to a healthcare organization that could work to help diabetes patients develop and maintain healthy habits and respond appropriately to changes in their blood chemistry.

The priority was on making it as simple to use as possible, not necessarily making it a peripheral to your phone or your computer.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
9/25/2014 | 12:51:46 AM
PowerPurse and Go-Anywhere-Wheelchair
Ideas keep sprouting every now and then and results in sometimes pretty absurd, and sometimes pretty awesome technology. PowerPurse is simply a clever piece of technology that does not cause smartphone users (mainly girls) to lose confidence that their phone batteries may dry out when they're outside. 
Also, having a wheelchair controlled with a smartphone would be a nice idea. The wheelchair can be smartwatch or smartphone drivable and would have a lot of sensors on it. People are getting lazy and they would rather have their hands on a phone rather than on the wheels of a wheelchair, so be it.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
9/25/2014 | 12:53:45 AM
Re: Computerized products without the computer
"In this case, the usage scenario was to send medical monitoring data back to a healthcare organization that could work to help diabetes patients develop and maintain healthy habits and respond appropriately to changes in their blood chemistry.

The priority was on making it as simple to use as possible, not necessarily making it a peripheral to your phone or your computer."

What may seem simple to one may not be simple to another, or a group. Companies must find solutions to address each group, because the era of IOT and design runs on end user reviews and bad reviews means the company will incur losses over the lost trust.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
9/25/2014 | 7:38:17 AM
Re: PowerPurse and Go-Anywhere-Wheelchair
The power purse really isn't a horrible idea, but what about a smaller version more the size of a phone that you can tuck your device into for wireless charging?  If they can get to both a flexible battery so that the purse can be folded and wireless charging it wouldn't be a big step to make it into a mat that you can just lay your device on.  I would buy a mat like that in a heartbeat.  

The breathalyzer worries me a bit, I've seen young people with a home breathalyzer using it in exactly the opposite way that the marketing for these devices are pitching them.  Imagine a group having a contest to see who can get the highest blood alcohol level and still be upright.  I have no doubt that if the portable breathalyzer were  cheap enough to be an impulse buy that this will happen more often.

 
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
9/26/2014 | 2:11:35 PM
Re: PowerPurse and Go-Anywhere-Wheelchair
"The breathalyzer worries me a bit, I've seen young people with a home breathalyzer using it in exactly the opposite way that the marketing for these devices are pitching them.  Imagine a group having a contest to see who can get the highest blood alcohol level and still be upright.  I have no doubt that if the portable breathalyzer were  cheap enough to be an impulse buy that this will happen more often."

@SaneIT: Technology is bound to be abused. What we can prevent is the absurdity leading to such idiotic ideas that are based around abusing the technology. We can develop better safety nets for consumers and software.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
9/26/2014 | 2:14:35 PM
Re: PowerPurse and Go-Anywhere-Wheelchair
@SachinEE, your idea about a smartphone powered wheel chair may be nice. Eventually it'll be used in hospitals where nurses can monitor the patient on their PDA (or any other monitoring device) where the person bound to the wheelchair has went. They can also track the vitals of the person. IOT has a lot of uses in healthcare.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
9/26/2014 | 4:37:57 PM
Floome
According to the Floome's website you can reserve it for free. Even though I don't drink, I already reserved mine. I could give it to some of my friends, In any case, I wonder how many people who do drink will get it.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2014 | 1:30:29 AM
Re: Floome
I think all these devices are all great ideas.  I really liked the charger.  Too bad, they don't have it in smaller versions.  Would cops use the breathalizer when they stop people who are drinking under the influence?
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2014 | 4:42:54 AM
Re: Floome
@PedroGonzales: Probably yes. Most people would not be using that except parents and cops. This kind of technology has its own forms of abuses, however I don't think the percentage of abuse will overpower the percentage of use.
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