6 Ways To Consumerize IT Without Dumbing Down - InformationWeek

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6 Ways To Consumerize IT Without Dumbing Down
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batye
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batye,
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10/1/2014 | 12:25:01 AM
Re: 6 Ways To Consumerize IT Without Dumbing Down
could not agree more, I see the same trend as it no longer a option... it is a must have...
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
10/1/2014 | 12:23:50 AM
Re: Strive being the key word
interesting point, but I would like to ad, I think this days everyone keep forgeting about QA/Software testing...
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
10/1/2014 | 12:22:15 AM
Re: Connect with the software
could not agree more this days everyone in departments try to look at simple easy to manage solution...
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 7:22:20 AM
Re: Connect with the software
Asana, Box and Domo are good examples.  While they are very easy to use and the end user can get up to speed with them very quickly the holes they punch in corporate data protection policies can be frightening.  Even with Enterprise accounts it can be tough to manage where the files are copied and who really has access.  This type of bring your own service model means that IT departments need to be looking at similarly simple systems to provide the same functionality while keeping control of company data.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
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9/27/2014 | 4:25:45 AM
Re: Strive being the key word
@yalanand: Competition in IT was always serious and this "keeping score" only makes things a bit more interesting, where consumers can select (like they always have) what kind of accesories they like in the software and if that satisfies their need. Also most consumers do not buy softwares based on the cost, they buy software based on less complexity, visually easy on the eyes and accessibility to the user. Most users would not differentiate between a software that costs $99 with a one that costs $150 if the reviews are good and it is visually stunning.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2014 | 1:09:58 AM
Connect with the software
"The paradigm has shifted to the point where enterprise software is now taking its innovation cues from consumer software. But businesses can still be innovators.

As recent platforms like Asana, Box, and Domo show, the enterprise can benefit immensely from trends in consumer software. But copy-pasting features from the latest popular apps won't cut it. It's more important to look athow these trends are connecting people with their peers, their data, and their work—and then move on from there.

By distilling recent consumer trends down to the intrinsic value they provide, you can innovate your own IT in a way that streamlines your workflows without dumbing them down."


Precisely as the author point out, innovation comes from monitoring the needs of consumers and realizing what kind of features makes consumers feel closer to the software. For example, people are flocking to Ello because it is ad-free and we control information that is related to ourselves. Sooner or later facebook will have its time done and ad-free social networking sites will take over.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
9/26/2014 | 12:26:45 PM
Re: Strive being the key word
@SaneIT: Yes, a well thought out UI solves most customization and add-on problems. Also a better developed UI helps the device run smoother and give a powerful experience. Since the reputation of UIs are becoming bigger and better with android and windows and iOS in the play, everybody wants UIs to be of that standard. I think IT has a new job of keeping their score. Too low score and they may be looking at a shift of consumers from that particular product (software) to a different software.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
9/26/2014 | 12:24:00 PM
Re: Strive being the key word
@SachinEE: Dumbing down of the first launch of the software is not preferable. Many people would not be able to connect with the software if it is dumbed down. For example, if you show the beta test of the software having 100 different things, then you release the original software with 60 things just because "everyone must have the same thing and can upgrade as and when they like" may be deal breaking.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
9/25/2014 | 1:13:04 AM
Re: 6 Ways To Consumerize IT Without Dumbing Down
This is all very well-taken, Himanshu. "Conzumarization" is no longer really an optional idea, and in fact, you could even say it's not a trend anymore - it's just the way we do business. Maybe some niche organizations (I'm thinking gov't contractors with security needs, etc.) can afford to say 'we have a way of doing things that we're not going to change'.  Everybody else can't afford to. BYOD is the main culprit, but you're right to point out that the real issue is the conceps that are at work there, and the bleed down to all levels of work at the company.

I hear what you're saying on the social media/social apps front though, TerryB. Some people just don't want to use tools like that, and that's fine. To me, that's exactly what 'workflow' means - the way people do their jobs on a day to day basis. If apps like that aren't part of your day-to-day use, then they're not part of your 'workflow' (and there is a good point in not forcing it). Still, Chris's example is perfect - how many programs do you know where a feature you never use is right up in the front, and a feature you use every day is hidden away. That's what 'bad workflow' means to me.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
9/25/2014 | 12:34:51 AM
Re: Strive being the key word
I think UI's should be targeted according to market use. If a particular type of market likes to use UIs with developer perks then UIs launched should be of that type. Other than that they will be given the basic construct of the UI and then they can upgrade as and when they like.
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