Radar Gun Targets Texting & Driving - InformationWeek

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Radar Gun Targets Texting & Driving
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rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 2:15:21 PM
Re: A radar gun for eating a meatball hoagie while driving
Detecting a vehicle's speed with lasers or microwaves is an active transmission from the detector.  Detecting a phone transmitting a text message is passive.  I suppose anything is possible but passive detection cannot be "dectected" by a device in the car.  Besides, even if a device could detect a detector, how would it selectively permit the provider's cell tower to receive the RF-modulated text message and block it from the detector?

One way would be to scramble the detector by potentially sending a lot of noise on both sides of the phone's text message.  Doing so would require extremely precise collaboration with the phone and it would also be transmitting on a licensed band -- which is illegal.  Such a mechanism would also interfere with normal text message function for others which, if enough cars used such a device, solves the issue for everyone since text messaging will no longer be possible.

 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 2:11:49 PM
Re: Hands Free Texting?
>>changing the radio (steering wheel controls are almost standard equipment)

But I haven't seen one yet you could put CD's in. Or an automated robot that pulls it from your carrying case when you say "Metallica". Yes, I know I could digitize my 800 CD's but surprisingly I have not found the time to do that. :-)

But you and I are in perfect agreement on this article, the police aren't going help using this technology.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 2:10:44 PM
Re: Fix is needed for rampant problem
Some motorcycles (like the KTM Duke series) have an alarm for sidestand. If the sidestand is down (i.e. in use) then the bike won't start. Only by putting up the sidestand can you start the bike. Similarly a smart car would have alarms and won't start the car unless it detects seatbelts being properly used. For this we can use two small sensors on the seatbelt and on the clip.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 2:07:40 PM
Re: Hands Free Texting?
You hit a mailbox, and I hit a tree. The only thing I remember before passing out is sirens blaring. Ever since texting has been a trend people love to take chances while driving too. Hands free texting (telling Siri or Cortana to text a message to your contact using your voice) can be done but with so many background noises I hardly think that would be of any help. Even inside a sound damper car with windows rolled up, I think it is still very dangerous to have your concentration swayed away from the road. To stop texting we can probably install a sensor which detects any text message being sent. If it detects then it jams the signal inside the car. The only way to do the text will be to stop the car, go outside and get a signal and then text.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 2:00:23 PM
Re: Hands Free Texting?
I agree, we cannot stop almost limitless reasons for distracted driving.  The last thing we should do is single out a particular behavior by arming law enforcement with a hopelessly flawed tool.  Car tech has advanced to help prevent problems with changing the radio (steering wheel controls are almost standard equipment) and I cannot understand anyone's resistance to advances in other areas that make us safer.  

What's baffling is anyone who favors arming the police with a flawed tool over building better car + mobile device tech that continues to provide the function while mitigating most of the distraction.  Hands free texting seems the obvious solution and for those unwilling to use it, disabling manual text methods while driving seems comprehensive, effective, cheap and less intrusive and divisive than paying more taxes for flawed tools and clogging the courts with even greater levels of trivial stupidity.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 1:39:56 PM
Re: Hands Free Texting?
@rradina, when I first learned how to drive I hit a freaking mailbox while changing radio stations. That is just something you better learn if you want to stay alive while driving, pay attention to the road! You aren't going to keep people from changing their radio while driving with any technology.

This is just another of many, many reasons you can hurt yourself, or someone else, while moving a 4000 lb machine at up 70 MPH. Let's face it, humans are too flawed to be trusted doing this with 100% chance of being successful every time.

Like David said in article, people know better than to text and drive. Short of banning people from driving cars completely, you are never going to be safe on a highway.

And for the record, I am one person who doesn't text and drive because I rarely even carry my cell phone with me. Unlike many, I guess, I do remember when life was achievable without a cell phone with you at all times. Now my wife on the other hand.....  :-)
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
9/22/2014 | 1:29:49 PM
Re: Fix is needed for rampant problem
I agree: And seat belts, too. I remember riding around in the front seat, as a kid, without a seat belt and opening up the door. Almost fell out. Thankfully my dad caught me -- and then locked the door. Don't think I got to ride upfront again!
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 1:22:40 PM
Re: Hands Free Texting?
It doesn't tell the cops. It's no different than existing car tech that disables, for instance, fiddling with various car setting while the vehicle is moving. (My car won't let me set various vehicle preferences unless the vehicle is in park.) Such a solution still works if you use the hands free option. Tech can solve this issue unless we're all to boneheaded to allow it.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 1:04:17 PM
Re: The Problem Is Proof
Agreed if bad driving is witnessed by law enforcement. However it will matter if, as some suggest here, the detection of texting is used as probable cause (i.e. a text trap vs. a speed trap) for a stop. Regarding social justice, not sure I agree. While civil law is less exact, criminal law is written and enforced to eliminate nuances such like the appearance of guilt or whther or not someone deserves to be accused and convicted.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/22/2014 | 12:51:23 PM
Re: Hands Free Texting?
This is something manufacturers (phone and car) can choose to collaborate on and get it done.  As soon as someone creates proven tech and ONE car manufacturer and ONE phone manufacturer offers it, the others will follow.  They'll follow because they will probably fear lawsuits for not adding it because a case can probably be made that they are at least partially responsible?  NOT EVERYTHING REQUIRES REGULATION.


@Rradina- Well, let me put it this way. I don't text and drive often ir at all. But if I was looking at two smartphones and one told the cops when I was texting and one didn't, I'd buy the one that didn't.

And even if it didn't tell anyone, but just shut itself off, I'd buy the one that didn't. Especially if i couldn't turn it off.

People don't like options on products they can't turn off, especially options that lower the use of the product. I'll ALWAYS buy the phone that lets me do what I want before accepting that the phone knows how to run my life better than I do. And I'm not alone.

Just ask Apple how many people were annoyed at having to have a U2 album on their phone whether they asked for it or not.
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