September 16 - Day 1: Introduction To Current Cloud Options - InformationWeek

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September 16 - Day 1: Introduction To Current Cloud Options
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Cloud is not perfect and is here to stay; the more we can know about it, the burn will not be as painful otherwise. Thank you Joe.

Apprentice

Please feel free to continue this great classroom discussion! I want to take just a moment, though, to remind everyone that our next class is on Thursday, September 18, at 2:00 PM EDT. We'll look forward to seeing everyone there -- and remember, you can tell colleagues and friends about the course and they won't be left behind. Today's class (and discussion) will be available at this URL on a long-term basis.

Strategist

@Brian.Dean--I think the "outsourcing workloads to the cloud" is an interesting example, and I wouldn't actually call that hybrid, because I think the point of separation is big enough to call them separate deployments.  Netflix has a great write-up of their system architecture (http://techblog.netflix.com/2013/03/system-architectures-for.html) that talks about "online", "nearline", and "offline" processing.  I think anything that needs "online" processing would qualify as "hybrid", but if you're doing "offline" processing (like pre-rendering images), then I would still call it a separated architecture, because the network really doesn't have to be particularly reliable for that use case.

Ninja

Good point, and most of the times that 5MB file is 1,000 times more valued than a cat video on YouTube.

Ninja

A 10Mbps dedicated line to Amazon is projected to rn $1000/month.  This jsut adds tothe overall cloud offerring costs.  10Mbps is not even that big a pipe.

I've am exploring some possibly viables alternative to MPLS and carrier ethernet.

Apprentice

@Brian.Dean--I don't think net neutrality is that clear-cut.  I think Net Neutrality is a win for people who want to access websites and applications that are run by individual and organizations without much money and/or who are unpopular, and for people who want others to access those sites.  I think Net Neutrality is also a win for businesses without much money and/or who are unpopular.  On the other hand, Net Neutrality isn't all excellent.  For example, it drives me nuts when hotels have free wifi and don't implement any Quality-of-Service rules, because it just means that a bunch of people are streaming video and/or downloading torrents, and I can't get enough bandwidth to upload a 5MB file in less than 20 minutes.

Ninja

Thanks, that is a great answer. I recall some game developers (console) use the Cloud to speed up the rendering process.

Ninja

The VPN had too many dropouts.  It was mostly inconvenient with sessions being lost.  Not a good connection method for production use with enterprise applicaitons.

Apprentice

@PeteB972--I agree with what you're saying, and I think that's one of the reasons why Amazon, Microsoft, and IBM have all announced ways that you can get a direct, low-latency connection between machines on their public clouds and your own hardware running in a data center.

Ninja

Would it be safe to say that net neutrality is good for consumers but not so good for businesses? Because, businesses should operate under economic rules, and not have to equally allocate network resources for every type of traffic (FTP or SIP). 

Ninja

@Brian.Dean--My favorite example of an application that really makes sense to deploy in a hybrid setting is a consumer reservations mobile app for a hotel chain.  Most hotels still run the master reservation database on a computer at each hotel (or at least near each hotel), so that is going to be a private deployment.  But if you're a national hotel chain, you're going to want to host as much of the application's backend services in a central place (whether that's a public or private cloud).  So you're really stuck with a hybrid  deployment there, and that's fine--it makes sense.

Another frequently-cited example is "cloudbursting", where you host an on-premises application but you want to "burst" to the public cloud on Black Friday, when lots of people are hitting your site.  I actually think that's a pretty weak example, because in almost all circumstances, you'd be better off not dealing with the network issues between the two deployments... and you'll likely never get to test it adequately, so the likelihood that it's successful is incredibly low.

Ninja

@PeteB972, could you clarify something you wrote? "VPN simply did not have the reliability needed..." -- does that mean that the connection wasn't stable or that you weren't satisfied with the level of security?

Strategist

@Lorna--I think for reasons of both net neutrality and network reliability, it makes increasing sense to diversify the different routes your customers can take to your application.  One of the less-covered (by the tech press) emerging trends today is the large number of data center providers who are "cloud-ifying" their data centers, and then rolling up into consortiums of providers to sell access to various parts of the world that are not well-served by the major public cloud vendors today (e.g., Middle East and Africa).  My guess is that organizations that can afford to do this type of diversification (and I think the major cost will be the infrastructure to easily move/deploy applications to data centers all over the world) will be well-positioned no matter what the end result is for net neutrality (or network topologies).

Ninja

VPN simply did not have the reliability needed when connecting an AWS hosted application to a local on premise database.  I consider this a hybrid use, though I think hybrid really refers to enterprise cloud mixed with cloud.

For wholely internet accessed applications network is not really an issue.  

When extending your internal network to a cloud services bandwith and reliability are paramount -- and costly.

Apprentice

Lorna has raised a great point I never considered separate services in the same firm as not being a hybrid setup. If hybrid is that which is "intermingled" what are some common application that require a hybrid setup?

Ninja

@Curt--My guess (and I don't really have any hard data on this) is that "hybrid" (an application deployment split between public and private clouds) is more common than "separated" (having at least one application deployment purely on a public cloud and having at least one application deployment on a private cloud).  Both of them seem like exception cases to me today--most organizations presumably are essentially all one or the other right now for actual deployed applications, but of the two, I would think that most organizations end up not being able to completely isolate an application to one environment.

Ninja

If at some point you or  your cloud provider have to pay an ISP for fast lane access, that changes the cost picture.

Author

@Joe, Getting a lot of ppl wanting to talk about net neutrality. Seems like something companies considering cloud should be mindful of, right?

Author

@Brian.Dean--The biggest network issue that I worry about is not traffic per se, but instead reliability: dropped connections, excessive/unreliable latency. There's a great write-up by two really smart guys explaining all the ways that the network is not reliable.  There's a formal link for the paper (http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=2655736) as well as an easier-to-read one in blog format (http://aphyr.com/posts/288-the-network-is-reliable).

Ninja

@Joe, I like the term "separated." For further definition, do you make a distinction between separated and intermingled? If so, which do you feel is more common, at this point?

Strategist

@Lorna--I do think there are definitional issues with "hybrid".  I prefer the term "separated" to describe an organization with some private and some public, because "hybrid" implies some kind of intermingling to me, and I think a lot of the examples of hybrid (e.g., cloudbursting) are definitely in that intermingled state.

Ninja

@jworsham372--HIPAA doesn't actually present particularly sticky issues with the public cloud (see, e.g., Amazon's page on compliance), as far as I know. The bigger issues seem to be where the federal government has more vague requirements on how companies should treat personally-identifiable information (PII), and so those companies get very concerned that anything bad that happens on the public cloud could be blamed on a bad strategy to go with the public cloud.

Ninja

medical and educational data an example where hybrid cloud could be used/

Apprentice

Do firms with virtual cloud and SDN experience network traffic issues? If yes, what type of traffic?

Ninja

entirely *internally* ...

 

Author

Joe, Is it fair to say "We have a hybrid cloud IT strategy" even if some services run entirely and some run entirely on public? After all, it technically IS a mix.

 

Author

Great audio session! I learnt a lot.

Ninja

@Curt, interesting point, some companies need to update their networks.

Ninja

I wonder if the problem is a disconnect on meaning of "hybrid"

 

Author

HIPPA requirements?

Apprentice

@Brian, the most common reason I've heard is network bandwidth limitations. It's the sort of problem that cloud services can solve in the server space: too bad there isn't a good analog in the LAN space (yet).

Strategist

Thanks @Kiacovacci, why do some companies block live audio streams? Is it security related or concerns about employee productivity. 

Ninja

@[email protected] - are you still having problems hearing the audio?

Apprentice

Thanks, @kiacovacci!

Strategist

Thanks InformationWeek University this is a great Cloud session so far!

Apprentice

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Apprentice

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Apprentice

Thanks @Curt, we will post questions as they come to us. Interesting lecturer!

Ninja

How to listen the voice?. Do we have any dial in number?.

Apprentice

Hello, everyone -- we're pleased to see you here. Joe will be joining the conversation at the bottom of the hour: That will be your chance to ask questions and discuss cloud options with him. Feel free to ask questions as they occur to you -- Joe will take a few moments to catch up as he gets up to speed here.

Strategist

Good Afternoon Everyone

Apprentice

Good Afternoon Everyone!

Ninja

Please go ahead and introduce yourself when you arrive, and be sure to download the slide deck for today's class.

I'm Curt Franklin, executive producer of radio here at UBM Americas; I'll be introducing Joe and kicking things off in about 12 minutes. Thanks for being here: This should be a great InformationWeek University course!

Strategist

Hello--this is Joe Emison, your lecturer for this excellent series. I'm excited to present to you and answer your questions!

Strategist

We'd love to have your voice in the discussion here. To take part, just type your comment into the "Your Post" box and then click on the "Post" button below the box. Feel free to introduce yourself before the show starts -- I think you'll find that we're a very friendly community here! 

Strategist

Hey, everyone, we're glad you could join us! When the show is scheduled to start, an audio player should appear above the "Your Post" window. If it doesn't appear, you might need to refresh your browser until it does. If it appears but doesn't start playing, then you may need to click on the "play" button on the far left of the player. 

Strategist


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