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Apple iPhone 6, Apple Watch: What's Missing
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nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
9/18/2014 | 6:33:33 AM
Re: Megapixels
Most of the customers are not technology literate and cannot translate the specification of a device in accordance to the need. To save themselves from the hassle of understanding technology they just go for the one with most check boxes checked. Similarly, camera is another specialized area which many technology souls fail to understand. I think manufacturers are responsible for this misconception as they never shared the details with consumer except megapixels.
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
9/17/2014 | 1:34:37 PM
Re: Over all satisfied.
Same here. It's more a matter of certain situations. If you go on long trips where you can't recharge, then you could just swap batteries, vs having to have some kind of external power. Or, for service reasons, it's easy to just buy a new battery if the old one goes bad... but that's more a problem of older battery technologies (ie: the past). Then, there are the conspiracy theories (which probably aren't so much theory anymore) where the govt can utilize aspects of your phone if they like. If you can't remove the battery, you can't be fairly certain it's off and not accessible.
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
9/17/2014 | 1:30:32 PM
Re: Megapixels
The problem Apple (and other manufacturers) always face, is that to the uninformed consumer, it often does come down to specs. They go up to the display and see 3 phones, one has 8 MP, one 10 MP, one 9MP. A check automatically goes into the 'benefits' column of the one with 10 MP, even if the resulting photos are junk.

What sometimes saves Apple from this, is that they have done a really great job of selling the whole, and the experience, which sometimes overcomes this spec-silliness, even if the consumer doesn't understand why. It's typically in the tech forums like this where the people who *should* know better, don't... and end up just arguing specs.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
9/16/2014 | 2:12:58 PM
Over all satisfied.
I do agree I am disappointed by the lack of better video/picture quality on the new iphone. I find Samsung S5 to beat iphone in this regard. The issue of not having a removable battery fails to bother me though, . In my four years of using iphone, I have never felt the need to remove the battery for any reason, so for me it's a non-issue regardless of what other companies are offering. Over all I am satisfield with my purchase.
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
9/15/2014 | 2:19:51 PM
Re: Camera
Hi Martin,

I guess I should look into 3D printing more if I ever get time. So, you're saying I can 'print' a house or taillight out of the SAME materials they would be made out of as stock components? While I suppose that's possible (if the printing tech supports a suitable type of material), it sounds A) quite expensive, and B) I'm guessing there are WAY more limitations to it than one might find in some Popular Science or Popular Mechanics article. I know we're beyond the colored foam models, but I guess I just hadn't run across the details of that yet... though I haven't looked a lot. I suppose I did see some articles about printing tail-lights some time ago, but paid little attention to it... as I'm not in high need of printed taillights. I guess my point, at least in part, is that even if possible, it's probably expensive and Apple isn't really after those 5 people who might actually want such a feature (yes, a bit of exaggeration there to make my point). And, having worked in 3D modeling and rendering, i DO know how well little stereo cameras work in generation of decent models (or, better, don't work). You realize that a lot of what makes talilights appear and work as they do is actually internal detail in the plastics, right?

Unfortunately, yes, a lot of people were expecting some huge thing Apple would do next. Most of that is by media and so-called 'experts' drumming such expectations up (possibly similar to such articles on 3D printing, I might guess). But Apple doesn't need a next big thing any time soon to do just fine. I'm sure when the opportunity arises, they will be on it... but just look at the timeline for such advances in the past. The only reason it's expected  right now is becasue of the close success of the iPhone and iPad (though both were similar technologies), and that people expect Apple to fail after losing Steve Jobs. Put to two together and you get a mild form of hysteria.

The thing is, Apple is still ahead on their products, even if it might not look that way from the spec sheets. They have a better integration of the parts to make a stronger whole. Their sales are quite high and their profit marigin is high as well. And, while thier advancement on the iPhone 6 wasn't flashy, watch the keynote again. It was actually some pretty big stuff in terms of real-world usability and enjoyment.
MartinG680
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MartinG680,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/15/2014 | 1:02:47 PM
Re: Camera
Yep, you're behind on your 3D.  There are 3D printers that can make actual tail lights.  I can't link it on here, because the site blocks URLs, but there are 3D printers that can print houses, out of concrete.  Interesting how you have your finger on the Apple vs. Everyone pulse, but haven't run across the myriad of 3D printing capabilities that are daily showcased on the internet.

I think what everyone was expecting with Apple's announcement was a push in the next direction, and maybe even one new standard that wasn't already out there.  On the iPhone 5s, for example, they pioneered the fingerprint scanner, which was then adopted by Samsung.  It's strange that Apple made no major improvements over devices that are currently available.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
9/12/2014 | 7:55:50 AM
Re: Megapixels
What I would have liked in the camera system is faster glass. Currently the lens is at f/2.2. Apple should have improved the glass to f/2.0 or even f/1.8. That would help capture more light and dramatically improve image quality in low light environments.

For an average person who wants to get their snaps printed instead of keeping them on the cloud 8 megapixel is enough. As you right said the quality of the lens and the sensors used in the background defines the results of the camera. If we want to see the difference, we can compare the snaps taken from a lower model 8 megapixel, iPhone and one from the professional manufacturer. All their results will be miles apart.
mayall
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mayall,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2014 | 4:18:16 PM
Sapphire Crystal Displays are on 2 models
As mentioned in the product introduction, Sapphire Crystal Displays are included on both the Apple Watch and the Apple Watch Edition. The Apple Watch Sport uses glass. You can find detailed information on Apple's site.
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2014 | 12:50:32 PM
Re: Camera
Here's the thing with those numbers.

First, I've been through this before many times in the debate between Windows and Mac. Numbers ranged from 3% to high-teens for many years and is certainly higher now. But, it didn't really matter that much in the long-run, as the market was plenty big enough for solutions to exist in either camp, and one or the other was better for particular people regardless of market-size. It also never reflected, very well, the numbers of units in actual use at any give time. The numbers were based off metrics that didn't capture all the systems, and also failed to downplay systems serving as cash-registers or systems that broke, or systems that weren't put into use, etc. 

Second, as I indicated, there's that actual in-use problem. It doesn't matter much if Android has 81% in some form of distribution figures someone estimats, if they are only 30% in interactivity with the real-world. Where are all those units? People haven't figured out how to connect them to the Internet? They don't visit websites? They don't shop or buy apps? Are they sitting in shoeboxes while person uses their iPhone?

And, ultimately, as I indicated, so long as there are ENOUGH units in any market, market-share is mostly just a braging point. That goes both ways. When I say Android is a small share, it doesn't mean Android is bad or doesn't stand a chance... I'm just correcting the misperception that Android has the majority and thus, Apple must be in trouble again.

Regarding your example, I suppose I agree roughly, in that the more capabilities, the more things people will find uses for them. I'm not opposed to capabilities, but any manufactuer has to cut the list off at some point based on costs, how widely used they feel the feature will be, and most importantly, how well they can integrate and support that feature. All too often, I see features just tacked on for feature and spec sake. That isn't Apple.

And, maybe I'm a bit behind on my 3D these days, but I'm highly doubting your example is possible. First, a 3D camera on a phone isn't going to be able to generate an appropriate 3D model for such a task. Second, a 3D printer might be able to print a cool *model* of that taillight, but then they'd have to have some taillight manufacturer to make a real one out of appropriate materials.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2014 | 9:40:27 AM
Re: Camera
These figures are mostly from IDC and Gartner, a quick Google search brings up a link for Q3, 2013 sales, the report puts Android devices at 81%. More recent reports that I have come across were in the 87 to 89 percent range.

I feel each customer is unique with their own set of requirements. When functionality is enabled in a product, then market size grows and the expanded ecosystem provides greater benefits, similar to economies of scale. For instance, imagine the designer is also an owner of a classic car for which, taillights are no longer manufactured, and they have a broken taillight, using the Tango phone the designer could capture a 3D image of the taillight and print a new taillight using a 3D printer.
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