Starship Enterprise Needs To Outsource IT - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // IT Strategy
Commentary
3/29/2005
04:01 PM
Paul McDougall
Paul McDougall
Commentary
50%
50%

Starship Enterprise Needs To Outsource IT

A business trend has really taken hold when references to it resonate not only in the corporate world but also in popular culture. We've seen that previously with the notions of Megatrends, Tipping Points, the Peter Principle, and the like. Now, it seems, outsourcing is the latest business concept to work it

A business trend has really taken hold when references to it resonate not only in the corporate world but also in popular culture. We've seen that previously with the notions of Megatrends, Tipping Points, the Peter Principle, and the like. Now, it seems, outsourcing is the latest business concept to work its way into mainstream thought.Over the weekend, I took in the BBC's "The Kumars At No. 42"--a hilarious sitcom/talk-show hybrid featuring an extended Indian family that has immigrated to London. To help pay the bills, these fictional Kumars, incongruously, host a chat show from a television studio they've bolted onto their modest home in Wembley. Real guest stars appear as themselves.

Actor Patrick Stewart was in the hot seat as I watched on Sunday. Despite Stewart's attempts to move the conversation toward his theatrical career, the Kumars mostly wanted to know about Star Trek." At one point, Grandma Kumar pressed Stewart on why there were no Indians aboard the Starship Enterprise. "Didn't you need IT support?" asked the grandmother.

This drew a big, knowing laugh from the studio audience (and myself), and that indicates the extent to which Indians are now ensconced in the popular consciousness as the world's computer technicians. That's a plus for India--think of it as a form of "national branding." If even casual observers think India when they think IT, then the country has successfully positioned itself as a mainstream, albeit specialized, player in the world economy rather than just another exotic outsourcing destination.

That's good news not just for India but for anyone interested in peace and global stability. Prosperity, wealth, and good jobs cannot be confined to the United States and other Western countries if we expect the rest of the world to play its part in the eradication of global terror and the maintenance of reliable security and economic networks. It seems India Inc. still has a bit of marketing work to do, however. Apparently, its message hasn't yet reached the HR department at the United Federation of Planets. Are you listening, Capt. Picard?

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

News
Becoming a Self-Taught Cybersecurity Pro
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  6/9/2021
News
Ancestry's DevOps Strategy to Control Its CI/CD Pipeline
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  6/4/2021
Slideshows
IT Leadership: 10 Ways to Unleash Enterprise Innovation
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  6/8/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Planning Your Digital Transformation Roadmap
Download this report to learn about the latest technologies and best practices or ensuring a successful transition from outdated business transformation tactics.
Slideshows
Flash Poll