Peeple App: Creepy Yet Potentially Uplifting - InformationWeek

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10/2/2015
04:36 PM
David Wagner
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Peeple App: Creepy Yet Potentially Uplifting

A new "Yelp for people" app is potentially the biggest disaster on the Internet. It could ruin reputations, cost people their jobs, and destroy relationships. It could become a platform for hatred and cyber-bullying. Or, it could be all smiles and happy dances. You decide.

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It has been dubbed "slander-as-a-service" and "the most odious creation of the Internet so far." It is Peeple, the upcoming app that bills itself as "Yelp for people." Not surprisingly, anything that lets you "rate people" is going to get quite the reaction. There's every reason to hate it, and yet, it is so strangely 1950s Mayberry and Leave It to Beaver quaint in its beliefs that it is almost sweet.

(Editor's Note: At the time of this posting, the link to the Peeple home page http://forthepeeple.com/ was experiencing intermittent outages. We received no response to repeated attempts to contact the site's operators.)

Basically, Peeple lets you rate people from 1 to 5 stars on three different aspects of their character: romantic, professional, and personal. For now, let's skip the fact that those are very vague terms. You can leave a review of the person as well. Here's the scary part: You can review a person whether they are a member of Peeple or not, and they can't take down your review. At best they can comment on it.

[Stop! Don't take that new job until you get these questions answered.]

"People do so much research when they buy a car or make those kinds of decisions," said Julia Cordray, one of the app’s founders in an interview in this article, "Why not do the same kind of research on other aspects of your life?"

True, but when you read a car review, you're reading opinions about an inanimate object that is being marketed by a company. Unlike a car, I'm a human. I have feelings. I may or may not be trying to sell myself to anyone. If I do, I choose to whom I am selling.

(Image: sudoneighm via Wikipedia)

(Image: sudoneighm via Wikipedia)

There are major issues with Peeple, including:

  • There is no opt-out option at all. If someone rates you, you are in the system. At best, you can comment on the negative review. I can see it now, "Dave is good writer but a terrible kisser. I give him 2 stars." My only recourse is to say, "I got better at kissing, and I'm still a good writer."
  • There is no fact-checking. I am a darn good kisser! Seriously, you can basically say what you want as long as you swear you know the person.
  • Internet reviews are horrible. When do you see a restaurant called anything but "best place ever" or "like eating in the darkest pit of hell"?
  • There is no recourse for mistaken identity. Even if you assume all people are honest and fair (have you seen Twitter?), what keeps someone from confusing the good-writing David Wagner and the bad-writing David Wagner? It is such a common name, I'm constantly confused for an IT professor with the same name. Bad enough we slander people, but if we slander the wrong person there is no say to say "hey, it wasn't me."

There is a 48-hour review process where people who are being rated are allowed to contact the person rating them and convince them to change the review and/or bribe them and/or beg them not to ruin their lives.

Basically, this app gives someone the chance to ruin anyone's life at any time without any recourse whatsoever. The app will, if you rate too many people too low, rate you as a bad person, too. But seriously, there is little danger of this, considering how easy it is to assume an online identity.

Yet I see some positives here as well.

We all make mistakes in our relationships, especially our romantic ones. What if Peeple becomes the way to make amends? What if you really did wrong to someone in the past, and that was revealed on Peeple? Aren't there people in your life you wish you could apologize to, but you don't know how to reach? Peeple might just be a positive force for change, the great social media apology site.

There is also a practical and real problem of the 21st century to solve here. We live in a world where we interact with strangers on a daily basis. We no longer live in the small town or cozy neighborhood where everyone knows everyone else. When you meet a person at a bar or on Tinder or anywhere else, basically the only ways you have to judge whether that person is safe to go out with (or trust to babysit your children or hire to bring into your office) are by their looks and other trivial aspects. You look at them and think, "Well, they seem OK."

Is that the way we want to live? Do we go out on dates with the men who wear suits, but not the ones who wear jeans? The ones who shave, but not the scruffy ones? That attitude is shallow and dangerous. Bad people (not to mention rapists, muggers, or people who shoot up offices) can dress nicely and act nicely.

If you are a nice person who treats others well, wouldn't you want it known to the other people in the bar? Wouldn't you like your "treats people with respect" 5-star rating tattooed on your forehead? Wouldn't the other people in the bar like to gravitate to that person for a date or for friendship? Wouldn't you rather avoid the person who doesn't have that 5-star rating?

In the "good old days," everyone in the bar knew who the "wrong people" were, because everyone in a neighborhood knew each other. We have replaced that knowledge, essentially, with snap judgments, intuition, blind trust, and sometimes prejudice. What Peeple does, intentionally or not, is return to local knowledge regardless of the locale.

In other words, it is possible this will save as many lives as it ruins. What if you could look up the Peeple score of your Uber driver before you got in his or her car?

In fact, the people behind Peeple seem really well meaning, naively so. This is the company's response to the criticism it has received:

You deserve to make better decisions with more information to protect your children and your biggest assets. You have worked so hard to get the reputation you have among the people that know you. As innovators we want to make your life better and have the opportunity to prove how great it feels to be loved by so many in a public space. We are a positivity app launching in November 2015. Whether you love us or our concept or not; we still welcome everyone to explore this online village of love and abundance for all.

I'm willing to take Peeple at its word. Instead of branding this thing as the worst invention of a terrible Internet, let's talk about how to fix it before it is too late. The app isn't out until November. The founders have a chance to fix slander-as-a-service and make it social justice-as-a-service, but only if they make key changes to privacy policies.

What they got wrong is the naïve idea that people who have nothing to hide don't mind advertising the fact. It is like defending surveillance laws by saying, "I've got nothing to hide." That shouldn't be how it works.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio
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vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
10/9/2015 | 3:31:17 PM
Re: I fear the worst
It was only a matter of time until this happened since there were plenty of websites out there that did things similar to this.  Now is the time when people will be happy to have overly popular or common names.   All the John Smiths aren't going to care if someone trashes one of them. There are 46,455 people in the U.S. named John Smith.  Good luck figuring out who is who!
BertrandW414
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BertrandW414,
User Rank: Strategist
10/5/2015 | 5:03:56 PM
Hacktivists?
Who knows, perhaps some Hacktivist group will take an interest in this and melt their servers with a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. Perhaps that is what was going on when the writer of the article found that the site was unavailable.

Putting aside moral and ethical questions (which are substantial), the site may make advertising revenue if it can survive. I just hope that talent acquisition entities will take the high road and not look there for information about prospective hires, but how could some of them resist?! They would just tell themselves that they will take what they find with a large grain of salt, smile, and dive in. 
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2015 | 3:17:19 PM
Re: I fear the worst
It will offer yet another revenge review type to the bullying kind. I don't look forwarded to the release is this app.
glenbren
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glenbren,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2015 | 1:48:49 PM
Re: I fear the worst
I fail to see anything in the least bit positive about this app! It's a license to bully, and it will no doubt be used as such.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2015 | 1:10:50 PM
Sticks and Stones
Is this really any different than movie critics and even us commenting in forums like this? A positive or negative comment from someone you have no idea who they are can't really mean anything, can it? I could say David is the worst tech writer I've ever read in this forum but how many of you care what I think? Now, if I was Donald Trump saying that, Dave would be in BIG trouble!  :-)
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
10/4/2015 | 4:23:31 PM
Re: I fear the worst
I think you're right. Any positive aspects of the app will be lost in the sea of negative. I think this app is a terrible idea.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
10/4/2015 | 3:31:07 PM
Re: I fear the worst
There is positive side of the app but I am afraid the negative part will dominate. People are more interested in anecdote, gossip, especially ones with negative, even dark side. The good news can easily be tabled and forgotten but bad news can spread over 50 states in 1 week.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
10/4/2015 | 12:47:05 PM
Re: I fear the worst
I think this app will possess the same characteristics of humans both negative and positive.  Sort of like twitter.  There are people who can spread a message out, the same way, they spread negative  message around.  I read somewhere that this app raised a lot of money.  Would anybody here would sign up and star rating their friends and family members? I think it will distract people since it will create a lot of gossip about reasons for getting a high or low rating.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
10/3/2015 | 11:15:13 AM
Re: Peeple, Peeple Who Need Peeple...
Funny you should mention Marie Curie, as she died of cancer contracted as a direct result of her research.  Innovation is definitely a two edged sword.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
10/3/2015 | 11:12:07 AM
I fear the worst
For better or worse (mostly the latter from a cultural perspective, though the civil rights movement was a definite plus) the world isn't what it was in the 1950s (but I wasn't there, since I was born in 1961);  but even in the part of subsequent history I remember (most of it), courtesy has gone from being perceived as a cardinal virtue, to nearly a vice in the minds of many people; and civility is now openly disparaged.

Much will depend on what those managing the service do, but Peeple is much more likely to be used as a political weapon than as a means of facilitating the "everybody knows everybody else" atmosphere of small towns (which I rather like).
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