Parenting Tips From IT Pros - InformationWeek

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9/30/2014
09:06 AM
Ellis Booker
Ellis Booker
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Parenting Tips From IT Pros

Make sure you're raising Junior the IT way.

6 Things Not To Do With iPhone 6
6 Things Not To Do With iPhone 6
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

They administer global enterprise networks, easily discuss cutting-edge tech like big data and Internet of Things, and patiently troubleshoot mind-numbingly complex coding errors.

But IT professionals have home lives too: they have husbands, wives, and partners. And some are parents, just like you and me, right? Wrong.

IT professionals know things about parenting that others can only dream about. So unless you're too tired from being up with a feverish 4-year-old two nights in a row or pounding on the kitchen table about a teenager's never-started-but-due-today history report, check out these tips.

DO: Bring a smartphone into the delivery room.
DON'T: Give into the impulse to check work email, not even during those frequent downtimes between contractions.

DO: Set up a webcam in the baby's room.
DON'T: Broadcast the Baby Room Cam (BRC) outside the LAN (without updated firmware and a properly configured firewall) because, breastfeeding.

[Check your wardrobe: IT Dress Code: 10 Cardinal Sins.]

DO: Immediately introduce your infant to tablet computing. Flipboard is a great choice.
DON'T: Worry about buying her a smartphone before she's 18 months old. (She can always Skype or Google Hangout on the BRC.)

DO: Encourage healthy debates between twins by buying one an Android and one an iPhone.
DON'T: Punish children by taking away phones/PCs/tablets/or server passwords. That's cruel (and they'll hack the server anyhow). For big discipline problems, consider installing Windows Vista.

DO: Photograph entrees while eating out. These will become precious family snapshots (or videos, if you all wear helmets and GoPros).
DON'T: Photograph the lunch you just enjoyed with the kids at McDonald's because you promised your partner (twice) at breakfast you'd take them to the organic farmers market.

(Source: Photojojo)
(Source: Photojojo)

DO: Teach your kids how to swim.
DON'T: Bring anything with a screen or an on/off switch to the pool, not even in that expensive, "waterproof" case that got 300 positive Amazon reviews.

DO: Teach them how to reformat a hard drive and reinstall an operating system.
DON'T: Ever let them practice this without adult supervision. "You have an awesome responsibility and a great power now. You're like Batman."

DO: Take them to your place of work for Take Your Child to Work Day.
DON'T: Forget to remind them about the Batman thing.

CTA Digital's 2-In-1 iPotty with Activity Seat for iPad
CTA Digital's 2-In-1 iPotty with Activity Seat for iPad

DO: Send them to young programmer summer camp.
DON'T: Let them catch you reading the lesson handouts, scratching your head, and cursing.

DO: Buy twice as many USB charging dongles as you think you're going to need for the rest of your life.
DON'T: Arrive at Disneyland and realize you forgot to pack a cord with a Lightning connector. Thanks, Apple.

DO: Pick sleepaway camps near beautiful lakes, rivers, and forests.
DON'T: Pick camps with those ludicrous "no technology" policies. Your children will hate you for it, forever -- as they should -- and they'll stick you in a bad retirement home the first chance they get.

DO: Teach children to use the Internet and social media safely and responsibly.
DON'T: Tell them where you met your husband/wife/partner or the screen name you used on that dating site. (It's also probably time to close that account. You're a parent now.)

The Internet of Things demands reliable connectivity, but standards remain up in the air. Here's how to kick your IoT strategy into high gear. Get the new IoT Goes Mobile issue of InformationWeek Tech Digest today. (Free registration required.)

Ellis Booker has held senior editorial posts at a number of A-list IT publications, including UBM's InternetWeek, Mecklermedia's Web Week, and IDG's Computerworld. At Computerworld, he led Internet and electronic commerce coverage in the early days of the web and was ... View Full Bio
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thomasjennifer
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thomasjennifer,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2015 | 12:31:39 AM
Opinion
The point which are shared above are really beneficial for IT parents to take care of their baby. I like the point where you have mentioned  of applying  cameras in baby's room so as to keep an eye on her .
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
10/1/2014 | 10:35:56 AM
Re: Social media
yeah. I like the idea of guiding a child about potential professions while they are young such as the programming camp.  I also like the idea about participating in Lego clubs were they can learn about programming and have fun designing robots.
glenbren
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glenbren,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 11:57:25 PM
Re: Social media
Internships are great, and they often lead to employment.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 11:08:44 PM
Re: Social media
@glenbren,

Very true, but I do think is that a piece of that employment puzzle is to be able to perform accordingly, and not lack what enterprises consider "basic" know how

This is why I strongly support companies that provide intership programs, since it's a great way for students to get there feet wet, be able to make and learn from mistakes and open the road to more opportunities
glenbren
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glenbren,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 10:36:12 PM
Re: Social media
50 books, really? And you have to buy them yourself? I wish you luck! There are ebook lending places online. Amazon has a lending program for ebooks as well.

I don't think today's students will have any more trouble entering the business world than those in the past. I think the hardest part is finding employment in the first place.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/30/2014 | 5:34:37 PM
reformat the hard drive? that's living dangerously.
Better just to get the young 'uns a Chromebook. Then if they really show interest you can switch to developer mode and let them run amok in Linux.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 4:56:29 PM
Re: Social media
@shamika,

Being a father of two...my wife and I area dealing with an environment that's very towards technology.

Just yesterday my son's school sent an assignment, a reading challenge, 50 books by the end of the school year. My first thought was "Ok, so how do I get access to an eBook library", since it wasn't my first choice to out and start buying books only to later donate them.

I am concerned when today's students (which aren't exposed to huge big heavy books) will be able to perform in the business environment that awaits them? (since memos still need to go out, tech documents still need to be reviewed)
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 4:52:02 PM
Re: So thoughtful.
@shamika,

For some of the clients that we provide consulting services, the have enabled Citrix to allow resources to remotely connect and be able to troubleshoot from any location. Only people with connectivity issues at home would need to drive in, but most are able to work remotely.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 4:48:58 PM
Re: Social media
For my son, we basically have a defined punishment, no Wii/PC/Tablet/Nintendo DS,

We've found that is more productive then simply asking him to stand in the corner
Ellis Booker
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Ellis Booker,
User Rank: Moderator
9/30/2014 | 12:55:04 PM
Two laptops paradox
DO: Put valuable electronics on desks or bookshelves if you have curious toddlers at home. (The two laptops paradox refers to the following: If you put two, identical Macbook Airs on the floor with a small child, the child will invariably destroy the one containing vital, never-backed-up business data that you need for critical meeting the next morning.)

DON'T: Make me laugh. Putting things on desks or shelves won't protect you.
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