MWC 2016 Paves Path For Connected Cars - InformationWeek

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2/28/2016
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MWC 2016 Paves Path For Connected Cars

Autonomous and connected cars were spotlighted at this year's Mobile World Congress. With 44 million of these vehicles expected to hit the road by 2030, tech companies such as Nokia Networks and Qualcomm are joining car manufacturers to roll out state-of-the-art features.

Formula One

Qualcomm's technology partnership with the Mercedes Formula 1 team aims at testing the chipmaker's new technologies for autonomous cars, while at the same time making F1 race cars even faster. "One of the first technologies that we are testing is a high-speed wireless access to get important data off the vehicle quickly so the team can evaluate data in real-time," said Aberle.

The Mercedes F 015 offers an executive-lounge-like interior where people can relax, work, or just enjoy the trip. It also includes eye-tracking gesture and touch-controlled screens on both sides to allow interaction with the vehicle, or email and Internet access.
(Image: Susan Fourtané for InformationWeek)

The Mercedes F 015 offers an executive-lounge-like interior where people can relax, work, or just enjoy the trip. It also includes eye-tracking gesture and touch-controlled screens on both sides to allow interaction with the vehicle, or email and Internet access.

(Image: Susan Fourtané for InformationWeek)

Since driverless technologies are invading the F1 space, some may wonder if Hamilton might be out of a job soon enough. Hamilton said no.

[Read more about the 2016 Mobile World Congress.]

"I don't think they are going to replace us in the racing cars, which is a good thing, but in the road car? Yes, I think it's exciting," said Hamilton, adding he's not a huge fan of driving on the road. "I can't stand traffic."

Already Here

AT&T has partnered with several automakers to add next-generation technology to their connected services. This includes the Audi R8 V10 Plus 2017 with 4G LTE connectivity, WiFi capability, and Google Earth for the navigation system. This vehicle is already available in the US and Canada.

In addition, AT&T and Porsche have entered a multi-year connected car agreement.

In Europe, the Opel 2016 4G LTE system is already available, and includes eCall, auto-crash detectors, vehicle diagnosis, and voice activation to get directions which will appear on the screen panel with a number of different language options.

Munich-based BMW is preparing its 5 Series self-driving prototype. However, the German automaker's next generation of smart vehicles will not appear until 2020. The Jaguar F Pace is also joining the connected cars race by sporting Intel under the hood.

With so much on the horizon, this year's MWC could only really offer a glimpse of what's to come with connected cars. Fasten your seat belts and get ready for a one-of-a-kind ride toward the near future of driverless cars.

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Susan Fourtané is a Science & Technology journalist, writer, and philosopher with a life-long interest in science and technology -- and all things interesting. She has been a technology journalist for nearly 10 years writing and reporting for global print and online ... View Full Bio
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Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 9:05:53 AM
Re: The Security Implications of Connected Cars
@progman2000    That's coming next !   : ) 
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 9:04:30 AM
Re: The Security Implications of Connected Cars
@tzubair    I was thinking of the use of scanners, I don't know if this is used in the area of phones but I have read/heard that this is a  tool of choice  for car hackers.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 7:14:33 AM
Re: The Security Implications of Connected Cars
@Tzubair, the FBI might fight with your car company to get access to your car's CPU lol
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 7:12:40 AM
Where does this leave motorsports?
It seems quite likely that within a few years, autonomous AI cars will be able to drive harder, faster and for longer than human drivers. While great for consumers and commuters, where does that leave motorsports?

A few years of drivers vs AI could be fun, but when the latter can easily outpace the former, where does that leave us? Do we say goodbyte to human driven cars forever, or will this just open up a new sport with less risk to enjoy?
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 6:09:08 AM
Re: The Security Implications of Connected Cars
@Technocrati: What's the security issue surrounding connected cars? From what I understand, the level of security required would probably be the same that you need on your phone. What could be other threats?
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
2/29/2016 | 4:35:31 AM
Re: The Security Implications of Connected Cars
Technorati,

in the case of connected and autonomous cars the security comes in the networks and solutions that make the connectivity possible.

What car manufactures have to watch is the security protection against cyber-attacks and intrusions, which cause malfunctions, or threten the physical integraty of the driver or pedestrians. 

Software and connectivity for connected and autonomus vehicles will become more critical. Safety and security telematics will play an important role, thus, they need to be enhanced since the start. Security vendors are taking care of this. 

Would you buy a totally autonomous car which has option of manual mode as well. or you would be happy with a car with some connectivity? :)

-Susan 

 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
2/28/2016 | 3:26:30 PM
Re: Fuel Cell vs. Lithium Ion
Brian, NASA also uses hydrogen fuel cells to power the shuttles' electrical systems. One benefit of this is that the crew can drink the clean byproduct> clean water. /Susan
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2016 | 2:34:43 PM
Re: Fuel Cell vs. Lithium Ion
The nice thing about generating hydrogen from water via electrolysis is that is it essentially a simple process. Water plus electricity yields O2 and H2 – very amenable to solar energy. The problem is that H2 is so very unstable. I believe there is work being done to make a stable form of hydrogen available for fuel cells, but the process is complex and involves cutting edge nanotechnology.

Lithium ion batteries are a troubled technology to say the least. The newest and most promising improvements also involve nanotechnology, and the manufacturing processes are entirely different than what Mr. Musk is using in his Gigafactory, so he may just have a billion-dollar white elephant on his hands.

The one thing for certain is that if we move away from gas powered cars, a titanic change in energy infrastructure will be required, which is unlikely any time soon due to lack of interest due to collapsing energy prices.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
2/28/2016 | 2:33:25 PM
Re: Fuel Cell vs. Lithium Ion
Brian, the aerodynamics in the Mercedes F 015 is also because the car is powered by hydrogen fuel cells. You wonder if they will make a come back. I would say that since the technology in the Mercedes is the best of the best there is problably a reason. :) /Susan
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2016 | 1:27:51 PM
Re: Fuel Cell vs. Lithium Ion
@Brian.Dean   I am not familiar with Hydrogen Fuel Cells, but isn't Hydrogen highly combustable ?  I like the advantages of use you mention, but if Hydrogen is highly unstable - it could be another reason for lack of adoption.

In addition to the tried and true test of costs.
<<   <   Page 6 / 7   >   >>
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