7 Cool Wearables For Pets - InformationWeek

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10/10/2014
08:06 AM
Susan Nunziata
Susan Nunziata
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7 Cool Wearables For Pets

New wearable devices let you track every second of your pet's life -- whether Fido and Fluffy like it or not. Is your best friend ready for FitBark?
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You think you have no personal privacy in today's digital age? Imagine what your dog feels like.

A slew of wearable devices enable you to see where your pet roams and perhaps even forge a new connection with Fido. These gadgets fall into two main categories: health/wellness and location tracking, with some offering a pet's-eye view of the world.

While you may not consider location tracking a priority for your pet, let me tell you about Jack. He's a five-pound mini-pinscher who owns... umm, is owned by my friend Allison in Oakland, Calif. Jack is an escape artist who would put Houdini to shame. Allison has Jack-proofed her home multiple times, and yet Jack always finds a way to escape. Each day, while she's at work, Allison receives text messages like the one below from her neighbors reporting their latest sightings of Jack.

So far, none of the devices we've seen can actually enable Allison to remotely order Jack to "go home right this minute!" What they can do is tell her where he is at any given moment, offer her a view of what he is seeing, let her know what his heart rate is, and, with the help of sympathetic neighbors, help her capture him more quickly in the future.

Someday, with the help of gadgets like No More Woof, Allison may even be able to go all Doctor Doolittle and ask Jack why, exactly, he would want to give up the comforts of home to wander the streets. Here's a video to explain:

While dog-to-human language translation isn't quite market-ready yet, wearable devices for your pets aim to help you understand what your companion needs by monitoring every aspect of his physiological behavior. This is useful if you can't bear to glance up from your electronic device long enough to actually read your dog's or cat's body language. Because, apparently, when a dog stands at the door and barks, that isn't enough of a clue for most humans to figure out the dog needs a walk. We'd much rather figure it out by looking at a dashboard on our tablet that says he might be feeling restless because he didn't get enough play time today.

Click through the slides to learn more about No More Woof and six other pet wearables that aim to help you and your four-legged friends attain a higher level of understanding and wellbeing.

If you're not completely satisfied, you can always take the money you're thinking of investing in a pet wearable and donate it to a worthy animal charity instead. One option is Best Friends Animal Society, where feeding time never ends:

After you've flipped through the slides, tell us what you think. Would you put a wearable on your pet? If so, why? And, should canine-to-human translation ever become a reality, what is the first question you would ask your dog? Tell us all about it in the comments section below.

Susan Nunziata leads the site's content team and contributors to guide topics, direct strategies, and pursue new ideas, all in the interest of sharing practicable insights with our community.Nunziata was most recently Director of Editorial for EnterpriseEfficiency.com, a UBM ... View Full Bio

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Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
1/31/2015 | 8:46:07 PM
Re: Wearable for doggie bladders?
@Shakeeb: It depends on the pet, but yeah, I think some of them would chew on it or treat it like a toy. or just break it in the process of trying to remove it.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
1/31/2015 | 8:44:37 PM
Re: Cool idea... we had 3 dogs at one time...2 of them were adventurers/runners.
@Shakeeb: i think that's the most important role these devices can play, though there's still a long way to go before any device can truly let us "talk" to our animals.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
1/31/2015 | 8:42:50 PM
Re: Cool idea... we had 3 dogs at one time...2 of them were adventurers/runners.
@Shakeeb: Not yet, at lesat based on the products I've seen. Improved battery life, or perhaps the ability for the device to recharge via solar, would be a great solution, but anything like that would make the device too large for any but the biggest pets.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
1/31/2015 | 8:40:38 PM
Re: Wearable for doggie bladders?
@Shakeeb: Oh yeah, it's a communication tool for some of them. Heh.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/18/2014 | 12:54:13 AM
Re: What about the other pets?
Angel, 

Good thinking. :D Yes, babies could be next. 

-Susan 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/18/2014 | 12:46:57 AM
Re: What about the other pets?
Angel, 

Yes, and the turtles as well. :) I would like to know how wise is your turtle. They live quite long, so I assume your turtle could tell you lots of stories with the help of these pet devices. That, when someone realizes that there other pets in the world. 

-Susan
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
10/13/2014 | 4:20:29 PM
Re: Wearable for doggie bladders?
@Pedro yes, that would be ideal. a walker that scoops as well.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
10/13/2014 | 1:06:49 PM
Re: Wearable for doggie bladders?
@Pedro that would be very practical! It would also be good to have one that could walk dogs safely and legally.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/12/2014 | 6:13:53 AM
What about the other pets?
SusanN, 

I am a bit disappointed. What about wearables for other pets that are not the usual dogs and cats? What about adorable hamsters, goldfish, and bunnies? Even snakes, spiders, and lizards should be able to enjoy the benefits of pet wearables, don't you think? :) 

-Susan
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
10/10/2014 | 3:10:44 PM
Re: Wearable for doggie bladders?
Oh my dog has definitely "spite peed." I try to stay on her good side.
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