6 Job Search Apps That Restore Your Dignity - InformationWeek

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5/9/2015
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6 Job Search Apps That Restore Your Dignity

While some apps seek to make the job search as quick and carefree as possible, these attempt to restore dignity to a process that feels increasingly commodity-driven.
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(Image: Geralt via Pixabay)

(Image: Geralt via Pixabay)

If looking for a job makes you feel like a product for sale, or like someone who isn't respected as a human being, then these job apps are for you. Each app has at least one unique feature designed to help you feel just a bit less like a resume and a bit more like a valued individual.

These are nothing like Tinder for jobs. While those kinds of apps give job seekers plenty of freedom, and freedom is often good, they can also leave hiring managers with the perception that a prospective employee isn't all that committed to the position.

After all, if you use a job search app that is similar to one designed to find a one-night stand, chances are you might treat the job like a one night stand, as well. Likewise, job candidates can be left feeling used and discarded by employers using such apps to make hiring choices. And that isn't good for the hiring company, or the job seeker, in the long run.

While some apps seek to make the job search as quick and carefree as possible, others attempt to restore dignity to a process that feels increasingly commodity-driven.

It may not be possible to entirely re-humanize the job search. HR still uses checklists and search engines to go through resumes. In the end, the treatment you get depends more on the companies you apply to than the apps you're using. But the creators of the apps we're featuring here have listened to your pain points and attempted to solve them.

Check them out, and see if any of them will help you feel better about your next job search. And then tell us in the comments section below what your biggest pains are when you go searching for a job -- or when you try to hire someone for an open position in your company.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio

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kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2015 | 6:18:41 PM
The job of searching
I am liking the idea behind Hired. The worst part about getting a new job is the search, which tends to feel like another full time job. I'm going to have to check that out for someone I know that's looking in one of those areas.

LunchMeet also sounds likea great way to network.
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
5/13/2015 | 10:23:25 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch
impactnow, it's not that HR departments need to send rejection letters to everyone who applies to a position. That's obviously impractical. But if you've been contacted by them for even an intro phone interview, let alone made it to round 3 of the process, you deserve at least some sort of note that thanks you for your time.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
5/13/2015 | 3:05:32 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch

I am not sure it is as simple as a reply email box. I think it would be very time consuming to reply to all rejected candidates unless there was a one click type of solution in the their recruiting application that produced a standard rejection email vetted by legal. Years ago many companies sent snail mail rejection letters so it is possible, but the volume of resumes received today makes rejection more of an issue for already taxed HR departments.

Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
5/12/2015 | 9:53:33 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch
I wonder how much of the silence is due to a fear of putting something in a rejection email that is incriminating. If a HR staffer or the hiring officer responds personally, the rejected candidate might ask for a specific reason for their rejection. Answering that could open up that employer to potential discrimination lawsuits. It's a stretch, but I could see certain companies being overly cautious about it.
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
5/12/2015 | 8:38:13 PM
Re: personal emails?
@Dave, ok, that is different, but wouldn't an HR person use [email protected] company.com or are you suggesting that a lot of rejection emails come from a generic address like [email protected]?
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/12/2015 | 8:01:03 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch
@Kelly, it has happened at my end as well and the experience was with a complete industry. It did not matter if identity capital was increased and a new application was sent after a few years -- the result was the same, no response. The conclusion that I drew out of the experience is that either, the industry does not value human resources or that the industry does not care for identity capital and only values networking. 
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:44:04 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch
@Dave I've been in a similar situation - applied, interviewed, follow-up (twice) then nothing. The interview seemed to go well and I thought it was a poor reflection on the company that I never heard a response. Even if they had decided to go with another candidate, I would have preferred to receive a rejection than hear nothing at all.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:34:41 PM
Re: personal emails?
@soozyg- Just to clarify, i mean personal corporate email, not the email they use at home. Personal vs a no-reply email. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:33:12 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch
@brian.dean- I generally agree with you that not getting back to an applicant is a potential business error. I was interviewed for a position once that I wanted quite a lot. I thought the interview went well. I followed up with a thank you and was told I'd hear back in a week. I let two weeks go by, sent a polite followup and never heard back. A week later i sent another email saying that I had another job offer (which was true), but that I'd have preferred the job with them, and I asked if they had a sense of the timing. They never responded.

I have no idea if they hired anyone for that position. But I know I said to myself i'd never apply to another job there. If they did that to enough talent, there'd be a lot of people out and around saying, "hey, don't apply there. They left me hanging." Eventually, that hurts your hiring.

Probably a coincidence, but that company went out of business recently.
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
5/11/2015 | 12:28:23 PM
Re: personal emails?
Very interesting. I would think using private emails could even open the company to liability. For instance, if someone's email program gets a virus because it was used on the company system or if a candidate decides to sue the person who sent the email and the only connection to the company is the personal email. I don't know, that seems to be some food for thought.
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