Homeland Security To Test RFID At Borders - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
News

Homeland Security To Test RFID At Borders

Department wants to track visitors entering and leaving the United States

The Department of Homeland Security is experimenting with radio-frequency identification technology to track foreigners as they enter and leave the country. The agency hopes the technology will improve border management without delaying travelers.

RFID tags will be tested at a simulated port this spring, then at border crossings in Arizona, New York, and Washington state from July through spring 2006. "Through the use of radio-frequency technology, we see the potential to not only improve the security of our country, but also to make the most important infrastructure enhancements to the U.S. land borders in more than 50 years," said Asa Hutchinson, Homeland Security's undersecretary for border and transportation security, in a statement last week.

The tests will help determine whether to affix RFID tags to passports, visas, or other documents visitors must carry during their stay in the United States. The tags shouldn't slow visitors' movements through border crossings, a Homeland Security spokeswoman says. For tracking foreign visitors, RFID is more efficient than current rubber-stamping technology, Meta Group analyst Gene Alvarez says.

To protect privacy, the tags won't hold visitors' personal information, only serial codes linked to information stored in the Homeland Security Department's US-Visit (U.S. Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology) databases. The codes would be meaningless to any third party trying to access the information.

The tags will be tamperproof and difficult to counterfeit. Information on them can't be changed, and they won't be activated until they're issued. All this will prevent "skimming," the use of unauthorized reading devices to capture information from RFID tags, the government says. The tags also can't be used to track visitors' whereabouts while they're in the United States.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
News
How to Create a Successful AI Program
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  10/14/2020
News
Think Like a Chief Innovation Officer and Get Work Done
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  10/13/2020
Slideshows
10 Trends Accelerating Edge Computing
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  10/8/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
[Special Report] Edge Computing: An IT Platform for the New Enterprise
Edge computing is poised to make a major splash within the next generation of corporate IT architectures. Here's what you need to know!
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll