Jawbone's 2 New Fitness Trackers - InformationWeek

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IoT
IoT
Healthcare // Mobile & Wireless
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11/5/2014
12:30 PM
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Jawbone's 2 New Fitness Trackers

Jawbone takes on Nike and Fitbit with entry-level Up Move and sensor-laden Up3 fitness trackers.

8 Innovative Health IT Startups
8 Innovative Health IT Startups
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Jawbone took two more strides into the activity tracker market with the release Wednesday of an inexpensive entry-level device and a multi-sensor product designed to deliver in-depth health and fitness information.

Both trackers leverage Jawbone's new Smart Coach technology, which tracks users' data to better inform them about how and why fitness and health are affected. Smart Coach then uses this information to personalize feedback and help users attain their goals.

By addressing both ends of the wearables spectrum, Jawbone underscores the fractured needs of this segment of the moble health market, estimated at $238 million last year. In 2013, Jawbone accounted for 19% marketshare, according to NPD Group. Since then, newcomers have entered the arena, and existing competitors like Fitbit and Nike have delivered new devices and capabilities.

[Will regulatory hurdles slow the market? See Health Wearables Going Big In 2015; Questions Loom.]

Following the influx of $50 trackers from companies like Misfit and Bowflex, Jawbone unveiled Up Move, a $49.99 activity tracker that logs users' steps, exercise, and calories burned, as well as detailed information about their sleep, according to the developer. Made from nylon-like anodized aluminum, Up Move features a hidden LED display light on its face that users press to show progress toward their goals. It wirelessly connects to Jawbone's Up app via Bluetooth and is powered by MotionX technology.

The clip-on device -- slated to become available this month, and now available for preorder -- comes in five color combinations: black with onyx clip, blue with "fog" clip, grape with purple clip, ruby with red clip, and slate with yellow clip. The replaceable battery (the same circular type found in digital watches) lasts about six months, Jawbone said. For those who prefer a band, Jawbone also offers a $15 wrist strap, sold separately, in onyx, yellow, red, or purple.

Jawbone Up Move
Jawbone Up Move

Jawbone hopes its Up3 will attract more sophisticated users with bigger wallets. The sensor-packed, water-resistant device, scheduled for release later this year, will retail for $179.99. It includes a heart-health sensor to measure resting heart rate; automatically recognizes and logs workouts; and monitors sleep, all on a battery that lasts a week without recharging, according to Jawbone. Up3 also features food and drink logging; personalized goals; LED indicator; ability to connect with friends and family; an idle alert; smart alarm; and continuous software and app updates.

"Our advanced, multi-sensor platform delivers a huge amount of new health data, backed by our smart algorithms and our highly personalized Smart Coach system," said Travis Bogard, VP of product management and strategy at Jawbone, in a statement. "And because the technology is fully updateable, we're able to unveil great new features and experiences in coming months."

The device is lighter than Jawbone's older Up24 (which is still available for $129.99) and includes skin and ambient temperature measures, as well as sensors that measure everything from a user's heart rate to hydration, The Verge wrote.

Up3 will only be available at first in black, although Jawbone said it plans to offer additional colors.

Jawbone Up3
Jawbone Up3

Jawbone most differentiates its products, perhaps, by its Smart Coach software. Both Up Move and Up3 devices connect via Jawbone's Up app to the Smart Coach system, which tracks users' progress and provides them with personalized guidance so they can more quickly achieve goals, the developer said. As it collects more information -- about exercise, sleep, meals, and other biometric signals -- it delivers more insight, according to Jawbone.

The Internet of Things demands reliable connectivity, but standards remain up in the air. Here's how to kick your IoT strategy into high gear. Get the new IoT Goes Mobile issue of InformationWeek Tech Digest today. (Free registration required.)

Alison Diana has written about technology and business for more than 20 years. She was editor, contributors, at Internet Evolution; editor-in-chief of 21st Century IT; and managing editor, sections, at CRN. She has also written for eWeek, Baseline Magazine, Redmond Channel ... View Full Bio

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Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
11/7/2014 | 9:25:47 AM
Re: Breaking Down the Data
Like you, @zaioius, I think Jawbone was smart to recognize not everyone is willing or able to plunk down almost $200 for a fitness band. To me, $50 (or $65, if you add the strap) is about the right price point for a device that some studies suggest gets put in the back of a drawer after approximately six months. Now, I haven't tried the new Jawbone, but the low-cost fitness tracker sounds like really good value for the money given the free software that goes with it. Out of all the (many and growing number of) these devices flooding the market in time for the holidays, I'd put this one at the top of my list to review. At least for now!
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Ninja
11/7/2014 | 2:14:01 AM
Re: Breaking Down the Data
The market is growing for this kind of devices. One great thing about these kind of devices is : they are not very expensive (I am talking to you , smartwatch!). Its affordabilty makes them perfect gifts also. 

I agree on the naming of colors. They could simply tell: it is black! 
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
11/6/2014 | 7:12:29 PM
Jawbone products are nice!
I have a Jawbone Big Jambox Bluetooth speaker and it's excellent. Simple and easy to use with surprisingly powerful sound for its size. If these trackers have the same quality, I say thumbs up. The stats look good. I tried the Fitbit, and although it has more stand-alone display options (without looking at the app) than Jawbone's clip-on, the charge only lasts a week or so. Jawbone's clip-on costs half as much and the battery lasts six months. As for the more expensive band, I'd have to see the connection methods and display to really judge.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
11/5/2014 | 2:46:56 PM
Re: Breaking Down the Data
I have noticed that fitness tracker developers pay a lot of attention to the colors and the names of the colors of their devices. Reminds me of when, as a freelancer, I wrote web copy for a reseller of mobile phones and accessories. I've never seen so many ways to describe black and red!
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
11/5/2014 | 2:37:22 PM
Re: Breaking Down the Data
@Alison I can picture certain people making their selection based on color alone. But it is good to have different features to select from. 
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
11/5/2014 | 2:23:08 PM
Breaking Down the Data
Must say, the software's ability to discern whether a user is hydrated looks really interesting, living in FL as we do -- and makes me far more likely to check out this Jawbone product over competitors that don't have this feature. Like any gizmo or wellness device, users must figure out the features of most use to them personally, then compare products with those capabilities (in their price range), rather than get swayed by colors or other gee-whiz capacities that might go unused. 
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
11/5/2014 | 2:19:49 PM
Re: new fitness trackers
You said it, Ariella! Jawbone has the right idea, in terms of differentiating its product by the software -- and in offering a low-cost alternative for people who are generally interested in something more sophisticated than a pedometer but who don't want to spend around $180 on a fitness tracker. Around the $50 mark, I can see healthcare providers buying them in bulk (surely there's a volume discount?) and giving them to at-risk patients such as diabetics, at-risk pregnancies, post-surgery, etc., to encourage their use (and promote the ongoing goal of patient engagement).

 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
11/5/2014 | 1:22:25 PM
new fitness trackers
Well it is the season for such things. I saw Fitbits for sale at Bed Bath and Beyond today. I don't believe it's normal stock. A lot of things are added in for the holiday season as potential gifts. The advantage of fitness related stuff is that people may even buy them for themselves after the holidays when they take on the inevitable resolution to lose weight. 
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