NASA's Apollo Archive: 10 More Breathtaking Images - InformationWeek

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10/23/2015
07:05 AM
Nathan Eddy
Nathan Eddy
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NASA's Apollo Archive: 10 More Breathtaking Images

With more than 8,000 photographs of NASA's various Apollo missions released earlier this month, who could resist looking through the archive a second time?
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By now you've undoubtedly seen the photos collected by Kipp Teague as part of a companion website to his "Contact Light" personal retrospective on Project Apollo.

Teague's efforts have given space enthusiasts access to more than 8,400 new photos of NASA's Apollo missions -- InformationWeek showed you our 10 personal favorites earlier this month -- but with so many photos to choose from, how could we resist in bringing you a second glance at mankind’s most extraordinary achievement?

The mission to the moon, launched by President John F. Kennedy in 1961, was an audacious proposal, one with which the general public lost interest in following the historic landing of Apollo 11.

After decades, the endeavor still captivates the imagination, thanks in a large part to the brave individuals who made the 240,000-mile journey.

[Check our previous look at NASA's Apollo missions through the years.]

In the process, they gathered a dazzling array of photographic memories that put your vacation photos to shame.

These professional space travelers and amateur photographers managed to capture a world -- and an expedition -- that almost boggles the mind.

The images do more justice to the mission than any number of factoids or statistics could ever hope to achieve. The photos essential imperfections in contrast, focus and framing illustrate the indelible human nature of space exploration.

One may wonder how the Moon and the Earth would look as photographed by Annie Leibovitz, Robert Frank, or even Robert Mapplethorpe, but as your humble curator, might we suggest that the images presented here project a grandeur and frailty that comes from a place so far, and so close, to home.

(All images courtesy of NASA)

Nathan Eddy is a freelance writer for InformationWeek. He has written for Popular Mechanics, Sales & Marketing Management Magazine, FierceMarkets, and CRN, among others. In 2012 he made his first documentary film, The Absent Column. He currently lives in Berlin. View Full Bio

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mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2015 | 9:54:19 PM
Re: Back?
@yalanand I love conspiracy theories. A lot of times they're right. Anyways, I read that the Kepler space telescope discovered the star KIC 8462852 that you mentioned. So, nothing mysterious from NASA's part over there. Seti is also investigating among others.
In any case, who really would be surprised that we find intelligent life out there? They're intelligent, that's why they're not coming.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2015 | 3:57:05 PM
Re: Amazing
NASA should put a man on the mars. Or maybe a man in an astronauts suit in the Yellowstone national park and take pictures.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2015 | 3:33:25 PM
Re: Back?
Well the internet is all abuzz with the star that has varying levels of light intensity. Most conspiracy theorists agree that we might be seeing the first intelligent life outside the earth trying to build a Dyson Sphere around the star to create a wormhole. Why doesnt NASA point all its powerful telescopes at the stars directions? What about the Hubble?
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 11:10:36 PM
Back?
Will We Ever Go Back?
Why we didn't, actually? Certainly not because of distance or resources.
hho927
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hho927,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 4:59:42 PM
Re: Amazing
LOL

Your regular cars are still using the 50s technology. There are improvements in the combustion chambers, intake etc but it's still the same.

Your electric cars are still using the same electric motor that we had it for "centuries". and they called it's <sarcasm>new tech </sarcasm>. It's nothing more than a battery attached to a motor.

I'm sorry! There are improvements but not major break through. And i doubt that we'll make any break through because nowaday scientists are about $ first.
Maria10
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Maria10,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/26/2015 | 5:19:57 AM
Re: Amazing
Totally agreed with Li, that was long ago and its still something huge, cant wait to see other people explore the space and discover new planets
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
10/25/2015 | 9:08:27 PM
Amazing
I woild say those photos look amazing even if they are black and white and taken dozens of years ago. Landing on moon is a big milestone for human being, thougn until now our horizon is still not beyond moon yet.
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