10 IT Hiring Trends Confounding Private, Public-Sector CIOs - InformationWeek

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4/20/2015
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David Wagner
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10 IT Hiring Trends Confounding Private, Public-Sector CIOs

State government CIOs have some of the same hiring problems as their private-business counterparts. Here are 10 of the biggest trends in IT hiring and what executives can do to get the best talent.
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(Image: NASCIO)

(Image: NASCIO)

The National Association for State CIO's new report on the status of state IT workforces has just been released. Timed like the Olympics, every four years NASCIO reports out on the challenges facing state CIOs in hiring and retention. And as with the Olympics, those four years bring a host of new challenges, but also some familiar ones.

As always, state governments are dealing with a labor shortage. Whether you are in government or the private sector, however, many of their challenges will be familiar. There is a lot to learn from the study.

Small salaries compared to the private sector, tight budgets, compliance with state hiring regulations, and a lack of qualified talent are among the challenges facing state CIOs today. The study ends with a broad call to action for state CIOs to refocus their efforts around recruitment and retention and to become more innovative in the effort to find top talent.

However, there are some states that are starting to create new incentives to attract high-caliber IT talent. The private sector should take note.

A lot of the initiatives reflect advice we've been giving at InformationWeek.

The NASCIO study features responses from the IT departments in 49 states and territories across the US. This represents one of the widest geographical studies you'll find on hiring of IT talent in the country. A quick eyeball look at the participants reveals that Arkansas and Vermont were the only two holdouts. But it is safe to assume they didn't skip the survey because they are the only two states with no problems with labor.

Check out the trends in the report. See if they resonate with your challenges. And tell us in the comments how you are responding to the talent shortage in your organization.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio

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asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
4/27/2015 | 3:19:03 PM
Propaganda
Labor shortage is a mantra repeated over and over again by skinflint American entities -including government- because it doesn't want to pay fair market value for an American but would rather import an H1B Visa who can be compensated much less.  Further, American IT does not like to hire anyone not male or over 35 regardless of knowledge, skillsets, abilities, education and experience.  In fact, the more you have, the less likely you will be offered a job since those over 35 tend to know their true market value and won't work 90 hrs/wk. for $12/hr.

 

 
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
4/22/2015 | 2:35:59 PM
Re: money is not everything, even in IT
@Pedro: Basically the public sector doesn't give out internships for IT unless there is a good reason to do so and yes it may be the case that private sector wants some training which the public sector doesn't depend on, because the government IT work isn't so intensive, they third-party their softwares anyway. They only have to manage the databases.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
4/22/2015 | 2:32:53 PM
Re: money is not everything, even in IT
@Pedro: The real reason why government IT has such a long filling procedure is because they have multiple rounds of GD, PI and technical interviews that stretch out for weeks. For example, if you are given a PI date today, you probably are given a technical interview date after a week. 
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
4/22/2015 | 2:29:54 PM
Re: money is not everything, even in IT
@impactnow: Right now a man in my position would love a job that has stability and security and at the same time has great work life balance. I don't care about the money as long as peace of mind is guaranteed. The first few years in the IT sector was probably the toughest.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
4/22/2015 | 12:30:28 PM
Re: money is not everything, even in IT

Pedro in the current market I don't think talented IT professionals will be willing to put up with the paperwork and delays only to acquire a position that pays less. The competition for great IT talent is fierce if the government wants to garner this type of talent they need to adjust their pay and culture appropriately or it will impact us all.

PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
4/21/2015 | 1:43:07 PM
Re: money is not everything, even in IT
@ David. Personally, I wouldn't mind working on the federal government.  There are books to help applicants navigate the application and they have the long wait time to find out about the application process.  If a person has enough time and patience.  I think it is worth it.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
4/21/2015 | 12:51:45 PM
Re: money is not everything, even in IT
@pedro- That's interesting that the application process is a holdup considering talent is the biggest concern of the CIOs. The last thing a CIO needs to do is put off their best talent by the application process.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
4/21/2015 | 12:43:05 PM
money is not everything, even in IT
I think the public sector should do more to hire new graduates and provide more internships to college students.  I did notice that in the private sector it is really tough to get in unless you have the require experience and minimum training.  I agree that other perks besides monetary incentives and a decrease in the application process would help incentivize other candidates.  I tried to apply to the public sector in the process  I did learned to be very, very patient.
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