Estonian Hacker Fined For Cyber Attack - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
News
News
1/25/2008
03:24 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Estonian Hacker Fined For Cyber Attack

Estonian had blamed Russia for the attacks, which now appears to have been conducted by a group of students.

The massive denial-of-service attack that crippled many Estonian computers back in late April and early May of 2007, behind which many saw the hand of Russia, appears to have been waged by a handful of students.

Estonian authorities recently fined Dmitri Galushkevich, a 20-year-old ethnic Russian, the equivalent of about $1,620 for his role in an attack on the Web site of Reform Party of Prime Minister Andrus Ansip, according to the BBC.

Ethnic Russians account for a quarter of Estonia's population of 1.3 million. Galushkevich reportedly was acting to protest the removal of a Soviet war memorial from Tallinn, Estonia's capital.

Estonian authorities are continuing to investigate the attacks and they continue to believe that some of those involved in the attacks are in Russia. According to McAfee, the malicious traffic directed at Estonian computers came from computers in the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Vietnam, among other countries. Of course, the location of computers involved in the attacks doesn't necessarily indicate anything about the location of those initiating and directing the attacks.

In a report on cyber espionage issued late last year, McAfee quotes Mikel Tammet, director of the Estonian communication and information technology department, as saying, "It was a political campaign induced by the Russians; a political campaign designed to destroy our security and destroy our society."

At the time of the attacks, Kremlin spokesperson Dmitri Peskov denied that the Russian government was involved in the attacks in any way.

The extent to which governments around the world support nationalistic hacking is not clear. Whether governments encourage it, indirectly support it, or simply turn a blind eye toward it, hacking for king and country appears to be just the latest arrow in nations' political quivers.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
Commentary
2021 Outlook: Tackling Cloud Transformation Choices
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  1/4/2021
News
Enterprise IT Leaders Face Two Paths to AI
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  12/23/2020
Slideshows
10 IT Trends to Watch for in 2021
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  12/22/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll