Yammer And The Freemium Trap - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Cloud // Software as a Service
News
1/10/2012
05:13 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Yammer And The Freemium Trap

Suppose your organization doesn't want employees using an unsanctioned enterprise social network in the cloud. How do you shut it down?

10 Important Cloud Apps For SMBs
10 Important Cloud Apps For SMBs
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)
Some organizations have an allergic reaction to Yammer, the cloud-based enterprise social network with the freemium business model.

Anyone can sign up for a free Yammer account, with nothing more than a verified email address at a particular domain. Yammer groups all of the free accounts that share an Internet domain into a private social network--a great collaboration option for lots of small businesses and some larger ones. The company behind the domain only has to sign up as a paying customer if it wants to assert administrative control over that collaboration space. That's how it worked when Supervalu adopted Yammer as the grocery chain's enterprise social network. A group of employees started using the tool on an ad hoc basis, the company's CEO found out about it and saw the possibilities, and the unofficial collaboration environment became the official internal social network.

On the other hand, some CIOs and other company leaders see this as a problem. They find out after the fact that employees are collaborating and discussing all sorts of company business on an unsanctioned cloud service. When they learn the only way they can get administrative control over this environment is to sign up for a commercial account, they are pissed.

Suppose I don't want a commercial account, I just want to shut this thing down? Yammer's official response is that I can't do that--as far as they are concerned, these are a bunch of individual accounts that just happen to share a common email domain.

I know this because I discovered that there is a Techweb Yammer group associated with my email address ([email protected]), populated by other employees of the Techweb division of our company who at some point were curious enough to sign up for an account. It looks semi-official, but it's a rogue social network with no official standing. I also used this example as part of my presentation for a BYTE webinar on "The Rise of Social Networks in the Enterprise".

Our parent company UBM has an corporate social network based on Jive, but as far as I can tell has made no particular effort to shut down the Yammer alternative. Nor do they need to. Because all of our employees and all of the most active discussions are on the official collaboration environment, this Yammer instance is a sleepy backwater, mostly forgotten even by the people who do have accounts.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/18/2012 | 5:42:16 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
Thank you for that clarification. It's good to know there is a mechanism for dealing with the former employee issue, as easy as making sure the email account is deleted. That was not clear to me.
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/12/2012 | 11:22:11 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
To be clear, they told me there was no way as a non-paying customer to delete accounts as an admin.
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/12/2012 | 7:52:53 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
As a business strategy, the viral growth model seems to be working quite well for Yammer

http://www.marketwatch.com/sto...
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/12/2012 | 5:27:56 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
Their support organization told me there was no way to take administrative control and remove accounts. You have to convince the individuals to log in and remove their own posts and accounts. I did have someone tell me that if you make a big enough stink, you can eventually get Yammer to change its tune (see the post below quoting from a contact who works in the security-sensitive aerospace/defense industry)
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/12/2012 | 4:52:54 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
I asked Wayne Shurts at Supervalu what he would have done if his CEO had instructed him to shut down the Yammer collaboration space, rather than embracing it. His response was that he would have tried to convince his CEO that was a bad idea.

Shurts said he understood what I termed the "allergic reaction" some organization might have to finding out their employees are active on on unsanctioned collaboration service. "That's why we quickly moved to pay for the service and have it all safe," he said. "My advice, rather than fight it would be to embrace it, You're never going to stop people from talking, or sharing ideas, so be smart about it and embrace it."

Doing so has led to a "much more open style of communication and transparent style of leadership" that has benefited the company.

From that perspective, the companies who seek to shut down a Yammer instance might be making a mistake. But we all have the right to make our own mistakes, and I don't think your company's standard response to organizations that want to opt out is winning you any friends.
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/12/2012 | 4:41:04 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
Another perspective from one of my contacts on Google+: "We were one of the first to execute a complete shutdown within Yammer and it was initially resisted by the Yammer staff but we eventually prevailed in being removed from the system (with blocks to prevent reentry into the system). It is not a matter of being "easy" or "hard" for Yammer to execute this action - but rather their preference to keep a foothold in what may eventually become a "relationship." If they can be convinced that keeping that foothold will sour any potential future relationship, they will likely do the right thing and execute a cleanup of their service and a "shutdown" for your enterprise."
Slideshows
11 Things IT Professionals Wish They Knew Earlier in Their Careers
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  4/6/2021
News
Time to Shift Your Job Search Out of Neutral
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  3/31/2021
Commentary
Does Identity Hinder Hybrid-Cloud and Multi-Cloud Adoption?
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  4/1/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Successful Strategies for Digital Transformation
Download this report to learn about the latest technologies and best practices or ensuring a successful transition from outdated business transformation tactics.
Slideshows
Flash Poll