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IoT
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Infrastructure // PC & Servers
Commentary
10/8/2008
06:00 PM
Allen Stern
Allen Stern
Commentary
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What's Next For WordPress?

WordPress is a popular blogging platform that's available in a variety of versions, including: self-hosted (WordPress.org), hosted (WordPress.com), and WordPress MU for multiple blogs on a single installation. The current version of the blogging software is 2.6.2 and the hot talk around the blogosphere is what's coming next for WordPress?

WordPress is a popular blogging platform that's available in a variety of versions, including: self-hosted (WordPress.org), hosted (WordPress.com), and WordPress MU for multiple blogs on a single installation. The current version of the blogging software is 2.6.2 and the hot talk around the blogosphere is what's coming next for WordPress?Over the last week we've started to see what's next. On Oct. 1, the WordPress team posted a set of wireframes for the 2.7 release due out in November. Last weekend, co-founder Matt Mullenweg provided a live demo of the 2.7 release at WordCamp NYC. I've embedded the video from his demo below.

The administration interface in the 2.7 release looks amazing. While I find the current version very strong, the new version makes the process of managing a blog even easier. There's more flexibility for publishers to provide only the necessary features for different users. Another major change is the ability to install plugins with one click. The plugin gallery is now available directly from within the admin panel. Plugins can be installed with one click -- no more download, unzip, upload, install. They are working to make the theme gallery function the same way so you can install a theme with one click. The navigation is now docked on the left side of the page and nearly all of the components can be shifted to make the perfect layout for your needs.

There's also support in 2.7 for threaded comments. Most users have been asking for this to be added to the core installation for a long time. WordPress has set up the threaded comments so the administrator can decide which type of users can reply to a comment. In Mullenweg's example, he set it so only he can reply to a comment. Other readers are only able to post traditional blog comments.

After the demo, Mullenweg discussed the future past the 2.7 release. The discussion included a variety of topics, from continuing to make the upgrade process easier, security patches, rich media (photos/videos), WordPress as a hub, along with BuddyPress. BuddyPress looks pretty strong -- basically, it allows you to easily insert a social network inside your blog.

I am very excited for the 2.7 release and hope that other blogging platforms and CMS take note of how well WordPress handles the administration of a site or blog.

Here's Mullenweg's demo of WordPress 2.7:

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