IBM Drifts Slowly Toward Mainstream Cloud Computing - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Cloud
Commentary
2/10/2009
11:06 AM
John Foley
John Foley
Commentary
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

IBM Drifts Slowly Toward Mainstream Cloud Computing

Building on its 15-month old Blue Cloud initiative, IBM today introduces additions to its cloud computing portfolio and named new customers and partners. Big Blue's cloud strategy remains focused on the enterprise; customers can't pay by the minute with credit cards, as they can with Amazon Web Services and other general purpose cloud offerings.

Building on its 15-month old Blue Cloud initiative, IBM today introduces additions to its cloud computing portfolio and named new customers and partners. Big Blue's cloud strategy remains focused on the enterprise; customers can't pay by the minute with credit cards, as they can with Amazon Web Services and other general purpose cloud offerings.IBM's new products include a cloud-management dashboard called Service Management Center for Cloud Computing that works in conjunction with other its products, including the updated Tivoli Provisioning Manager 7.1 and Tivoli Service Automation Manager. Service Management Center for Cloud Computing can be used to monitor and manage "private cloud" environments inside a company's own data center. The ability to manage public cloud services such as AWS may come later, though IBM hasn't disclosed specific plans for that. (For more, see my post "IBM Turns To Cloud Management.")

IBM also announced Tivoli Storage as a Service, aimed at business continuity and recovery, not general-purpose storage. IBM already offers business continuity as a service; what's new is the Tivoli interface, making the service more appealing to IT departments that use the Tivoli platform.

In addition, IBM and Juniper Networks are teaming to demonstrate hybrid clouds, where private clouds overflow to secure public clouds when extra compute capacity is required. For now, the demo is limited to IBM's nine cloud labs.

What these and other IBM cloud developments, including new strategy and planning services and an organizational team focused on cloud computing, show is that IBM is methodically expanding its cloud platform capabilities. But let's be clear -- it's doing so with a focus on enterprise-class products and services, not on the broader market targeted by Amazon, Google, and others.

In fact, several of IBM's just-announced products and services aren't here yet. Tivoli Storage as a Service won't be available until sometime later this year, and the IBM-Juniper cloud bursting demo is just that, a demo, not a generally available service. (For more on cloud storage, see InformationWeek's downloadable report, "Cloud Storage's Top Uses.")

Ric Telford, IBM VP of cloud services, points out that IBM has been offering on-demand computing to enterprise customers for nearly five years, and he says the company has "several hundred" customer engagements involving its cloud services. New examples include Elizabeth Arden, Nexxera, the U.S. Golf Association, and Indigo Bio Systems.

Telford hints that IBM could offer a broader range of cloud services to a wider range of customers. "Other scenarios and use cases are certainly on the table," he says. As IBM plods along, however, other cloud service providers are forging ahead with cheap-and-easy services that appeal to individual developers, small businesses, and others outside the scope of enterprise IT. It will be interesting to see if IBM is able to catch up or, indeed, if it even tries.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
News
The State of Chatbots: Pandemic Edition
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  9/10/2020
Commentary
Deloitte on Cloud, the Edge, and Enterprise Expectations
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  9/14/2020
Slideshows
Data Science: How the Pandemic Has Affected 10 Popular Jobs
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  9/9/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
2020 State of DevOps Report
2020 State of DevOps Report
Download this report today to learn more about the key tools and technologies being utilized, and how organizations deal with the cultural and process changes that DevOps brings. The report also examines the barriers organizations face, as well as the rewards from DevOps including faster application delivery, higher quality products, and quicker recovery from errors in production.
Video
Current Issue
IT Automation Transforms Network Management
In this special report we will examine the layers of automation and orchestration in IT operations, and how they can provide high availability and greater scale for modern applications and business demands.
Slideshows
Flash Poll