Gov 2.0: Cloud Success Hinges On Collaboration - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Cloud

Gov 2.0: Cloud Success Hinges On Collaboration

Microsoft says the private and public sectors must work closely together for government to realize the promises of cloud computing.

Collaboration between the private sector and the federal government is necessary for governments to take full advantage of cloud computing opportunities, a Microsoft executive said Wednesday.

Speaking at the Gov 2.0 Expo in Washington, Microsoft's senior VP and general counsel Brad Smith said that adopting cloud computing has a number of advantages for the public sector that go beyond the obvious financial gains represented by moving software to the cloud.

"It's not just making government cheaper, but making government better -- that's the real opportunity that cloud computing offers," he said.

In an interview following Smith's keynote, Teresa Carlson, VP of Microsoft Federal, said she believes the government sector is slightly ahead of the private sector in planning for cloud computing.

This forward-thinking makes sense for the government's transparency efforts through the Open Government Directive, as well as to improve communications and collaboration between government agencies that often operate on disparate networks.

"It's no secret that over the years, the government has struggled a bit with having interoperability within an agency itself -- it's sometimes decentralized," she said.

She said the cloud is a way to enable people even in a decentralized network environment to collaborate and communicate quickly and in real time.

However, cloud computing also has challenges, and they are ones that only collaboration between all stakeholders can solve, Smith said. This means the government and the private sector must work together to create policy that promotes the move to the cloud.

"If we're going to make the most of cloud computing, we need government not only to adopt it, but to come together to enable it," he said.

The Obama administration already has been taking significant steps to work with the private sector to foster technology innovation. Earlier this year, the White House hosted 50 CEOs from top companies to discuss what the government can learn from the private sector.

Various government agencies such as the Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency also have made it a priority for cybersecurity initiatives to work with the private sector companies that own critical infrastructure used by government networks.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
News
Top 10 Data and Analytics Trends for 2021
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/13/2020
Commentary
Where Cloud Spending Might Grow in 2021 and Post-Pandemic
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/19/2020
Slideshows
The Ever-Expanding List of C-Level Technology Positions
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  11/10/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
Video
Current Issue
Why Chatbots Are So Popular Right Now
In this IT Trend Report, you will learn more about why chatbots are gaining traction within businesses, particularly while a pandemic is impacting the world.
Slideshows
Flash Poll