10 Emerging IT Trends From Gartner Symposium - InformationWeek

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10/9/2015
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10 Emerging IT Trends From Gartner Symposium

Here's a look at the top 10 emerging IT trends from the Gartner Symposium 2015, and what they mean for your IT operation.
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(Image: HebiFot via Pixabay)

(Image: HebiFot via Pixabay)

On Monday morning, David J. Cappuccio, vice president, distinguished analyst, and chief of research for the infrastructure teams with Gartner, strode on stage at the Gartner Symposium ITExpo 2015 in Orlando to talk about the top 10 emerging trends and what they mean for your IT operation. On one hand, this is the sort of talk that you expect from gatherings like this. On the other, this year saw several trends emerge that may indeed have a significant impact on your organization.

As is the case with all such lists, Cappuccio had a few that will almost certainly hit you squarely in the "Well, duh!" reflex point. There are others that will seem somewhat obvious after you've thought about them for a few minutes. (He's obviously thought about them for quite a lot of minutes.) If you're like me, one or two will be truly new ideas. It's the items in those last two categories that tend to make the whole exercise worthwhile.

[Read about the hottest jobs in IT for 2016.]

Cappuccio broke his list down into three categories: demand, technologies, and organization. The technologies category gets four trends, while the other two categories get three each. I'll keep them in the order they were presented, because there's no advantage to mixing them up. I will try to be very clear about which comments are his and which are mine.

One trend at the top of a lot of discussion lists at the Symposium was algorithms. Specifically, how those algorithms would be used to automate processes and procedures so they could be accomplished faster, more accurately, and generally better than if humans had a hand in them. The idea of automation will crop up as part of some of the trends discussed here. Do you think it should have been given its own spot on the list?

As always, I'm eager to know what you think about the list. Is it too obvious? Too esoteric? Just plain wrong? Let me know -- and I'll try to let you know what I heard in the halls and around the lunch tables at this giant gathering of IT industry executives.

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and ... View Full Bio

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kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
10/23/2015 | 8:52:57 AM
open source hardware
The trend I find most exciting is open source hardware. The ability to easily connect multiple components to make the exact hardware you want is fabulous. It may allow more people to create specific hardware, working as a first project for computer hardware beginners. I'm hoping with this idea of open source it also means that each comonent would have a more reasonable price (being exacly like the one that came before) than the price of a similar non open source componets plus what ever connector add ons you would need to make it work.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/23/2015 | 3:59:38 AM
Re: BI-MODAL - Planning and Operations
Brian, doing something looking for a long-term solution would be great, indeed. -Susan
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2015 | 12:34:00 PM
Re: BI-MODAL - Planning and Operations
That's represents another viewpoint of the BI-MODAL conversation. In technology, I have to balance keeping the lights on with innovation. In respect to polar bears, those eco-tourism companies need to look for alternate revenue streams and help the bears. It's not one or other.
gnadivi
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gnadivi,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/14/2015 | 10:43:47 PM
Re: Global Data Center Management
"Faster, more reliable response to issues before they have an impact on operations" is far from the only reason automation is enabling Global Data Center Management as one of Cappuccio's 10 emerging IT trends.

 

Senior IT executives know that the buck stops with them.  There are more & more demands on their resources, but they can't increase headcount.  Even if they could, the people they want to hire are very expensive, and the really good ones are frankly pretty rare.  Automation lets senior IT executives meet SLA targets in a consistent, repeatable, auditable way that increases the quality of their deliverables and reduces costs.  Oh yeah, automation is pretty fast & reliable too!
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
10/13/2015 | 6:49:14 AM
Re: BI-MODAL - Planning and Operations
@Susan, I feel that the concern goes beyond revenue/profits. Technology firms such as, Saleforce and Tesla earns a lot of revenue but, their profits are almost non-existent. Either, there is a long term plan at play or the companies are passionate about their work.

Similarly, research into polar bears is going to further increase expenses -- if research is still continuing it would indicate that the businesses are trying to help ensure the long term survival of the bears. 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/12/2015 | 8:29:02 AM
Re: BI-MODAL - Planning and Operations
Thanks, Brian. :) Yes, I understand. But since they say "no bears no revenue" I wonder if the only thing that matters to them is the revenue they get. I mean, if they care just because they will lose they revenue, or if they actually care about the future of the bears. 

Yes, I agree that at some point consumers should change buying patterns. But, honestly, I don't see this happening any time soon. Not in the way it needs to happen to really make a difference and be truly beneficial for the environment. 

-Susan 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
10/12/2015 | 3:40:27 AM
Re: BI-MODAL - Planning and Operations
@Susan, the scale of the problem is too large for a single industry to rescue the polar bears or reverse climate change. However, a few businesses have a strategic advantage that helps the polar bears. For example, technology enabled polar bear tracking conducted by businesses can provide important information to scientists and the businesses have a supply chain in place that can cut-costs for undertaking a scientific expedition. It is a win-win situation as these businesses are already voicing their concerns the most because of their interdependent relationship.

CSR is a buzzword that a few businesses have exploited. But, a few businesses have gone beyond their responsibilities and have tried to make a difference. At the end of the day, consumers will have to change their buying patterns and invest in products that are friendly to the environment.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
10/12/2015 | 2:51:16 AM
Re: Workload Monitoring
I totally agree - this kind of workload monitoring/resource optimization needs more careful design. Otherwise it will run into a chaos - even the normal resource requirement will be hit.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/11/2015 | 9:23:01 AM
Re: BI-MODAL - Planning and Operations
Brian, 

"These businesses realize that in the future there might not be any polar bears in the region -- no bears, no revenue. And, new sources of revenues have to be located." 

Does the case study say anything about those businesses trying to do something to help the polar bears since the polar bears are their source of revenue, or they simply don't care about the ongoing extintion of polar bears and they only worry about finding any other species to replace the polar bears? 

Does the case study say anything about corportate responsibility and business ethics?

-Susan 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
10/11/2015 | 3:32:01 AM
Workload Monitoring
Workload monitoring can save financial resources but, I feel that it is a two-step process i.e. software should monitor everything and action should be taken to deploy or not to deploy resources where it is not needed. For example, I was imagining that I needed 8GB of ram in my laptop to function optimally, incidentally, the antivirus software that is installed also monitors resource utilization and according to it, 99.9% of the times ram utilization has never crosses 3GB. Multiply this with 100 users or a 1,000 users and significant savings can be produced.

It is easy, if both processes are in-place and implemented. I wonder if service providers will provide the data or enable the capability for the enterprise to monitor peer-to-peer user environments and edge to edge devices.
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