Cloud Computing Use Increases With Improving Economy - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Cloud // Software as a Service

Cloud Computing Use Increases With Improving Economy

As the economy improves, IT managers are turning to cloud computing to help rein in increasingly complex virtual and physical infrastructure, a market research firm says.

Server revenue for private cloud computing will grow to $11.8 billion in 2014 from $7.3 billion in 2009, IDC predicted in a report released Monday. The much smaller public cloud market is also expected to grow significantly, rising to $718 million from $582 million during the same timeframe.

With many IT vendors heading to serve the growing cloud-computing market, IDC analyst Katherine Broderick said it's a "great time for many IT organizations to begin seriously considering this technology and employing public and private clouds in order to simplify sprawling IT environments.

IDC defines a public cloud as being open to a largely unrestricted number of potential users within a market, as opposed to a single enterprise. On the other hand, access to private clouds is restricted to a single enterprise and is an internal shared resource, not a commercial offering.

Other findings in the IDC report are that public clouds are less likely to be broadly adopted than private clouds and the public variety will be less enterprise focused than the private models. In addition, 44% of the IT managers surveyed for the IDC report said they are considering private clouds in delivering Internet-based services.

One of the reasons public clouds are growing slower than private clouds is distrust on the part of consumers. A March survey of online adults found that from 55% to 69% of the respondents would be only somewhat or not at all interested in using cloud computing for pictures, music, office documents, videos, or financial services, such as tax files or bank records, Harris Interactive said.

Security was one of the main reasons for distrusting public clouds. Four in five of the respondents agreed that security was a concern. Only a quarter said they would trust a cloud-computing service for files with personal information, while three in five said they would not.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
News
Top 10 Data and Analytics Trends for 2021
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/13/2020
Commentary
Where Cloud Spending Might Grow in 2021 and Post-Pandemic
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/19/2020
Slideshows
The Ever-Expanding List of C-Level Technology Positions
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  11/10/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Why Chatbots Are So Popular Right Now
In this IT Trend Report, you will learn more about why chatbots are gaining traction within businesses, particularly while a pandemic is impacting the world.
Slideshows
Flash Poll