Telstra CEO Sees Investments In China - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile // Mobile Business

Telstra CEO Sees Investments In China

Sol Trujillo says additional investments in Asia can bolster his controlling interest in China M, which provides mobile phone content in China.

Sol Trujillo, CEO of Australia's Telstra, is returning home to the United States this spring, but before he does, he plans to look into making some additional investments in China and other Asian companies.

Trujillo, the former chief of U.S. West and France Telecom's Orange, has a unique perspective on worldwide wireless markets because of his international background and because he has spurred Telstra's robust 14.4-Mbps next-generation network.

On Monday, he said Telstra is considering making additional investments in Asia to bolster its controlling interest in China M, which provides mobile phone content in China. Trujillo argued that acquiring stakes in China M and also in music services provider Sharp Point will boost the content services Telstra can offer in its native Australian market.

In an indication that Trujillo believes Telstra's acquisitions can be mutually beneficial to Chinese and Australian consumers, he said Next G technology can be used to upgrade services on its Hong Kong carrier CSL New World Mobility offering, too. In 2006, Telstra purchased a commanding position in SouFun Holdings, a major Web property site in China.

Trujillo's strategic investments have always attracted attention, because of his unique position leading major telecom carriers in the United States, Europe, Australia, and Asia. Telstra's Next G network, which utilizes 850-MHz spectrum, covers 99% of Australia's population and promises to offer eye-popping speeds of 42 Mbps by the end of 2009. That's fast enough to trump LTE for years and has made WiMax irrelevant in Australia, Trujillo has maintained.

After years abroad, Trujillo recently announced that he plans to return to his native United States.


Learn more about all the latest products and technologies at TechWeb’s Interop Las Vegas, May 17-21. Join us (registration required).

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
Strategies You Need to Make Digital Transformation Work
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/25/2019
Commentary
Enterprise Guide to Data Privacy
Cathleen Gagne, Managing Editor, InformationWeek,  11/22/2019
News
Watch Out: 7 Digital Disruptions for IT Leaders
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/18/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Getting Started With Emerging Technologies
Looking to help your enterprise IT team ease the stress of putting new/emerging technologies such as AI, machine learning and IoT to work for their organizations? There are a few ways to get off on the right foot. In this report we share some expert advice on how to approach some of these seemingly daunting tech challenges.
Slideshows
Flash Poll