Dell Tries To Wedge Its Way Into the Smartphone Space - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Business/E-Business
Commentary
8/25/2010
11:17 AM
50%
50%

Dell Tries To Wedge Its Way Into the Smartphone Space

Late to the party. That may be an appropriate way to characterize Dell's push into the smartphone market. However, the company has some strong traits that may make its products a viable option for small and medium businesses.

Late to the party. That may be an appropriate way to characterize Dell's push into the smartphone market. However, the company has some strong traits that may make its products a viable option for small and medium businesses.Dell announced its Aero, a low cost, Android smartphone that runs on AT&T's network. The vendor is banking on the device's small form factor and its integration with various consumer applications, such as Flickr and Picasa photo-sharing sites, YouTube, and Facebook, to gain traction in the hotly contested smartphone marketplace. The phone, which weighs less than four ounces, features a 3.5-inch, 640 x 360 pixels display, and a 5-megapixel camera.

Aware that it is behind competitors in the mobile device marketplace, Dell has focused its efforts on international markets. The Aero has been available in China and Brazil since the end of 2009. The vendor took the same approach with its tablet system, which also debuted in the US earlier this month.

Dell has lot of ground to make up. Competitors have been shipping such products for more than a decade and Apple has gained significant mindshare with its iPhone. In addition, Dell may also find it difficult to differentiate its Android system from those from companies, such as HTC, Motorola, and Samsung. In fact, the Aero is based on Android 1.5 operating system, a few releases behind its most recent iteration.

The vendor does have some potential strengths that it may try to leverage to convince small and medium business to buy its mobile devices. Traditionally, the company has been able to deliver low cost, easy to install and simple to maintain products. In addition, corporations are starting to view mobile devices as alternatives to desktop or laptop systems. Dell has more experience in this area than companies, such as Motorola and Research in Motion. So even though Dell is behind competitors in the mobile device space, the company has the potential to emerge as a major supplier among small and medium businesses.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
News
How GIS Data Can Help Fix Vaccine Distribution
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  2/17/2021
Commentary
Graph-Based AI Enters the Enterprise Mainstream
James Kobielus, Tech Analyst, Consultant and Author,  2/16/2021
Slideshows
11 Ways DevOps Is Evolving
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  2/18/2021
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll