IBM Watson Speeds Drug Research - InformationWeek

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8/28/2014
09:06 AM
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IBM Watson Speeds Drug Research

IBM Watson moves from supplying known answers to tough questions to making its own discoveries in life sciences and pharmaceutical research.

Baylor College of Medicine has published a peer-reviewed cancer study that was accelerated with help from IBM Watson Discovery Advisor.
Baylor College of Medicine has published a peer-reviewed cancer study that was accelerated with help from IBM Watson Discovery Advisor.

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tb100
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tb100,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/4/2014 | 12:58:34 PM
Re: I wonder if Watson
Giving Watson access to Snopes would certainly help:

www.snopes.com/medical/disease/cdcwhistleblower.asp
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/29/2014 | 10:04:57 AM
Re: Watson Pre-Announce-Re-Announce Syndrome
Totally agree, Susan. Not only has IBM spent a ton of resources on the technology, but they seem to be expending a lot of energy in seeking out different partnerships across an array of different organizations, each of which has an interesting take on a particular project or problem. Given the technologies Watson is based on, it will only improve as it learns, and I think it's going to be really, really exciting as it gets more mature and partners push its limits.
Alison_Diana
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50%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/29/2014 | 10:02:43 AM
Re: Asset possibility
Every time I speak to IBM about Watson, they are always very fast to stress the top role people play in using Watson. I'm not sure whether that's to allay the medical community's fears, prospective patient's worries, or because that's the reality, but I lean toward the latter -- it is the way the system is designed. Just as people might now collaborate with other human experts, then lean toward one person or another's  opinion, they can use Watson in the same manner. 
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 10:44:31 PM
Re: Who would have guessed ...
That's read, interpret and make connections much faster than any human could... reading fast is just the first step.
Ron_Hodges
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Ron_Hodges,
User Rank: Moderator
8/28/2014 | 5:30:13 PM
Re: Watson is not exactly comparable to iPad
As William Gibson famously wrote, the street finds its own uses for things.  Like an iPad, Watson is essentially a general-purpose technology.  People are writing tools for the iPad now that I suspect were over the horizon for the people who originally developed it.  And the same, for good or ill, will be true of Watson -- it will be positioned to ingest data and answer questions for purposes we cannot necessarily predict right now.  The surface has not even been scratched with respect to the power of "cognitive computing", but as Elon Musk warned with respect to AI, we better be VERY careful how this technology is employed.  In light of revelations regarding probable malfeasance by certain Intel-related government agencies, one can easily imagine Watson being perverted into a "pre-crime" analyst.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/28/2014 | 5:19:41 PM
Re: Watson Pre-Announce-Re-Announce Syndrome
@Ron_Hodges: Tech history is littered with hardware and software that were too far ahead of their time. Somehow, I don't think Watson will end up on that list, though. While we have a long way to go before we truly understand how to apply this kind of cognitive computing resource, eventually Watson-like computing will become commonplace. I only hope I'm not too old to enjoy it!
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/28/2014 | 5:16:32 PM
Re: Watson's on it
@Charlie: You read my mind! Next, I'd like to see Watson's capabilities applied to helping goernments and NGOs figure out how to provide steady sources of safe drinking water and food to the millions of people around the world who currently need those things.
Charlie Babcock
IW Pick
100%
0%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 4:57:45 PM
Watson's on it
The problem of identifying when and how life's chemistry goes wrong is a huge one, and I for one am glad Watson is working on it. Better Watson than me.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 4:20:19 PM
Who would have guessed ...
... that the most valuable thing we could teach a computer to do was read really fast.
kstaron
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50%
kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2014 | 4:09:23 PM
Asset possibility
Interesting idea to use it to find connections in medical papers. This could be a real asset to companies trying to understand and develop treatments for all kinds of illnesses. I still want real people behind it though to verify that it's conclusions are viable.
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