Facial Analytics: What Are You Smiling At? - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Data Management // Big Data Analytics

Facial Analytics: What Are You Smiling At?

Emotient's API provides "real-time emotional analysis" for use in focus groups and other consumer applications.

Some of us have our feelings written all over our faces. Others may pride themselves on being inscrutable. However, when a computer is analyzing our features frame by frame, it can glean insight from even the slightest quirk.

At last week's Sentiment Analysis Symposium in New York, Jacob Whitehill, a research scientist with Emotient, demonstrated the company's emotion recognition products. He showed how they isolate the faces in a video stream and track their expressions, from joyful to angry to sad. "It has many commercial applications," he said.

Emotient provides an API that enables real-time emotional analysis and offers highly accurate readings of positive, negative, and neutral emotions based on cognitive science, machine learning, and computer vision, Whitehill said. Mining large datasets of facial expressions, it can find patterns and sometimes even predict the way people will react to given stimuli. In addition to wide smiles and angry nostril flares, the software detects "microexpressions" like flashes of disgust or contempt.

According to Emotient's website, the API measures 28 facial action units, including eyebrow raises, nose wrinkles, lip curls, and jaw drops.

The obvious use case is for focus groups, with the software noting positive and negative reactions far more quickly and comprehensively than human observers. In research for consumer packaged goods, Whitehill said, facial analysis was a more accurate predictor of "proclivity to buy" than self-reporting by the subjects. It wasn't so much that certain package designs evoked huge smiles, Whitehill pointed out. "Lack of negative reaction was a strong predictor."

Read the rest of this article on All Analytics.

Michael Steinhart has been covering IT and business computing for 15 years, tracking the rising popularity of virtualization, unified fabric, high-performance computing, and cloud infrastructures. He is editor of The Enterprise Cloud Site, which won the Least Imaginative Site ... View Full Bio

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Madhava verma dantuluri
50%
50%
Madhava verma dantuluri,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/16/2014 | 6:08:03 AM
Good
Good share.
Gary_EL
50%
50%
Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
3/14/2014 | 10:38:19 PM
Why I didn't buy
This would provide some pretty important information for retailers. They can chart the course of a customer's visit to their store, and compare those who bought and those who didn't. They'll know what made us smile, what made us frown and what frustrated us. This will provide invaluable feedback about what caused our buy/not buy decision. It could also be used at restaurants - do our facial expressions reveal if we come back or not. I'm afraid, however, that privacy really is a thing of the past.
Mashka
50%
50%
Mashka,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2014 | 6:44:27 PM
Security reason
The first and the most obvious  usage of this application is for security. It may bey a great way to prevent some acts of violence in public places. But I wonder what else it can be used for?
News
How GIS Data Can Help Fix Vaccine Distribution
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  2/17/2021
Commentary
Graph-Based AI Enters the Enterprise Mainstream
James Kobielus, Tech Analyst, Consultant and Author,  2/16/2021
Slideshows
11 Ways DevOps Is Evolving
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  2/18/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you.
Slideshows
Flash Poll