6 Ways To Master The Data-Driven Enterprise - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Data Management // Big Data Analytics
News
5/4/2015
07:06 AM
Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

6 Ways To Master The Data-Driven Enterprise

Data-driven companies share characteristics that enable them to achieve more with their data than others in their industries. We reveal what separates the masters from the wannabes.
Previous
1 of 7
Next

(Image: Geralt via Pixabay)

(Image: Geralt via Pixabay)

Big data is changing the way companies and industries operate. Although virtually all businesses acknowledge the trend, not all of them are equally prepared to meet the challenge. The companies in the best position to compete have transformed themselves into "data-driven" organizations.

Data-driven organizations routinely use data to inform strategy and decision-making. Although other businesses share the same goal, many of them are still struggling to build the necessary technological capabilities, or otherwise their culture is interfering with their ability to use data, or both.

Becoming a data-driven organization isn't easy, however. In fact, it's very difficult. While all organizations have a glut of data, their abilities to collect it, cleanse it, integrate it, manage it, access it, secure it, govern it, and analyze it vary significantly from company to company. Even though each of these factors helps ensure that data can be used with higher levels of confidence, it's difficult for a business to realize the value of its data if its corporate culture lags behind its technological capabilities.

Data-driven organizations have extended the use of data across everyday business functions, from the C-suite to the front lines. Rather than hoping that executives, managers, and employees will use business intelligence (BI) and other analytical tools, companies that are serious about the use of data are training employees, making the systems easier to use, making it mandatory to use the systems, and monitoring the use of the systems. Because their ability to compete effectively depends on their ability to leverage data, such data-driven organizations make a point of aligning their values, goals, and strategies with their ability to execute.

On the following pages we reveal the six traits common to data-driven organizations that make them stand out from their competitors.

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include ... View Full Bio

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 7
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
PeterF028
100%
0%
PeterF028,
User Rank: Moderator
5/27/2015 | 2:51:53 PM
Forced reality
IoT is making the move toward data even more significant. Fortunately most CIOs (81%) already have it heavily factored into ongoing plans.  Without a good strategy of course, data can rapidly get out of hand. Peter Fretty, IDG blogger working on behalf of CSC. 
PeterF028
50%
50%
PeterF028,
User Rank: Moderator
5/27/2015 | 2:49:01 PM
Forced into data
As IoT becomes a reality, far more organizations will be essentially forced into being data driven organizations. According to the CSC CIO Survey, 81 percent already say data plays a heavy role in their operations. Peter Fretty, IDG blogger working on behalf of CSC
LisaMorgan
50%
50%
LisaMorgan,
User Rank: Moderator
5/6/2015 | 2:35:50 PM
Re: Very very frightening...
True and LOL.
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
5/5/2015 | 2:09:08 AM
Re: Think Big
@Li Tan, I would say you are right on the money :) but would like to say with technology developing soo rapidly this days - it like we could not even trust the past - knowlege...
Mike Cuddy, Toromont CIO
100%
0%
Mike Cuddy, Toromont CIO,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2015 | 5:09:27 PM
Very very frightening...
New insights from data can be threatening.  Tribal knowledge comes under attack. Foundations of assumptions start to crack. Oh Oh.
LisaMorgan
50%
50%
LisaMorgan,
User Rank: Moderator
5/4/2015 | 2:29:02 PM
Re: Think Big
Great points.
Li Tan
100%
0%
Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
5/4/2015 | 9:03:10 AM
Think Big
I think the critical aspect here is to think big in big-data era. We cannot simply use the experience from the past when we work with RDBMS. Furthermore, we need to think big - instead of just focusing on data itself, we need to mainly focus on how we can draw useful, reliable conclusion by using efficient analytics method.
Slideshows
How to Land a Job in Cloud Computing
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  6/19/2019
Commentary
How to Convince Wary Customers to Share Personal Information
John Edwards, Technology Journalist & Author,  6/17/2019
Commentary
The Art and Science of Robot Wrangling in the AI Era
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  6/11/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
A New World of IT Management in 2019
This IT Trend Report highlights how several years of developments in technology and business strategies have led to a subsequent wave of changes in the role of an IT organization, how CIOs and other IT leaders approach management, in addition to the jobs of many IT professionals up and down the org chart.
Slideshows
Flash Poll