AT&T Builds Wi-Fi Network For California City - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
News

AT&T Builds Wi-Fi Network For California City

Riverside's free service will be supported via advertising space on the network's home page.

AT&T Inc. has received approval to build its first WiFi network to provide free high-speed wireless Internet access throughout the city of Riverside, Calif.

The Riverside City Council on Tuesday agreed to a deal with AT&T to build the WiFi network, for a cost that some estimate at $8.8 million. The city will receive more than 1,000 access devices mounted on buildings and polls across 80-square miles.

The WiFi technology allows computer and PDA users with wireless access to connect to the Internet from parks and other public places, said Carl Nerup, vice president in the business development group.

"It's about making affordable broadband available to everyone," he said.

Construction on the network will begin shortly. Service options will follow in early 2007.

AT&T will support the free service by selling advertising space on the Web home page for the free wireless network. The telecommunications giant also will sell several package plans, including daily and monthly, giving users an option to connect to the Internet at higher speeds. A local Internet service provider will also have an option to sell access to the network.

"It would be incredibly valuable to have WiFi access in a 50-mile radius area around my work or home," said Brian Foster, director of information technology at Bradshaw International, a wholesale distributor of kitchen products to retail stores, such as Wal-Mart and Target.

Foster, who lives in Highland, Calif., about 15 minutes from Riverside, said as an IT professional having the ability to stop the car and pull over to the side of the road in an emergency to access the company's network could potentially solve an IT problem that might escalate into a crisis.

"I could pull over to the side of the road, turn my laptop on, and gain access to the company network through the VPN to fix any problems," Foster said.

Many cities want to provide municipal WiFi to residents. Initially companies like AT&T and Verizon resisted deploying the technology, said Roger Entner vice president of wireless telecom at Ovum. "If you can't beat them, join them," he said. "AT&T realizes if they don't provide the service, companies like Google or EarthLink will."

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
News
How to Create a Successful AI Program
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  10/14/2020
News
Think Like a Chief Innovation Officer and Get Work Done
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  10/13/2020
Slideshows
10 Trends Accelerating Edge Computing
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  10/8/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
[Special Report] Edge Computing: An IT Platform for the New Enterprise
Edge computing is poised to make a major splash within the next generation of corporate IT architectures. Here's what you need to know!
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll