Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Government // Enterprise Architecture

Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says

Mike Bibik, now an Amazon designer, says he hopes Fixing Windows 8 website will convince Microsoft to make changes to its new operating system.

Windows 8 Beta: Visual Tour
Windows 8 Beta: Visual Tour
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)
A former Microsoft employee has launched a website that outlines all of the problems he sees with the forthcoming Windows 8 operating system.

Fixing Windows 8, as the site is called, outlines the bugs, quirks, and design flaws that Mike Bibik, who was a Microsoft program manager, says detract from the Windows 8 user experience. "Microsoft made it very clear that Windows 8 will work fantastically if you are using touch, mouse, or keyboard. Unfortunately, that's not entirely true," wrote Bibik, in his initial post on the website.

Most of Bibik's complaints center on Windows 8's new Metro interface. Bibik says the Metro UI will be a navigational nightmare for users who aren't tech savvy. "Windows 8 just dumps you into the Start screen. No tutorial, no help icon on the main screen, nothing. This will be fixed by launch or Windows 8 will fail."

Bibik may be biased. He's now a user experience designer at Amazon, a company that is moving into competition with Microsoft on a number of fronts. Amazon's AWS cloud services group competes with Microsoft's Azure platform, and Windows 8 touch tablets will go head to head with Amazon's Kindle Fire when they launch later this year.

[ Will Win 8 tablets be locked out of the enterprise? See Windows 8 Tablets Could Be Risky Business. ]

Still, some of Bibik's points will doubtless resonate with Windows users who are used to the old Explorer interface, which will still be an option on PCs and laptops, and who primarily use a mouse and keyboard to navigate.

"The Start screen presents you with a bunch of colorful tiles to launch your apps. This isn't the entire collection of apps, just the default collection that Microsoft decided upon," wrote Bibik. "Getting to all of your apps is completely undiscoverable."

Bibik also gripes that Windows 8's new full-screen apps, which can only be downloaded from the new Windows Store, will cause problems for average users.

"The user might be able to figure out that their scroll wheel, used for years to scroll up and down, will now scroll left and right ... If not, the user sees a very small portion of the full app and is very confused. This confused user wants to go back to Start and try something else, maybe that will work."

Despite his barbs, Bibik insists his Fixing Windows 8 site is meant to attract constructive feedback that he hopes will convince Microsoft to make some tweaks to the OS. "Over the next few weeks, I hope to explore these issues deeper and maybe even come up with solutions Microsoft can use. This website is meant to be informative, not just negative."

Microsoft launched the Windows 8 Consumer Preview last month. The company has not announced a ship date for the final version, but it's widely expected to be released before year's end.

Predictive IT analytics can provide invaluable insight--vital if a private cloud is in your future. Find out how in the new, all-digital Predictive IT Analytics issue of InformationWeek. Also in this issue: Randy Mott named CIO of General Motors, how Dell is pushing into the enterprise data center, and eight key features in Windows 8. (Free registration required.)

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
AustinIT
50%
50%
AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2012 | 8:32:14 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
I don't think that publicly yanking down Microsoft's shorts while working for one of their competitors is what I would term "contructive criticism". On the other hand, I think he is spot on with what he infers as Microsoft's long running problem with understanding what "intuitive" means. To me, that has been their achilles heel in UX design. That, and their aweful tech documentation.
ANON1237925156805
50%
50%
ANON1237925156805,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2012 | 7:34:06 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
Microsoft seems to be trying to emulate Apple in contrast to Google by steering the user experience. Unfortunately where Apple seems to know what you want before you do, Microsoft has historically been tone deaf.

Still, I'm willing to withhold judgment. At this point in the mobile space at least Microsoft has a chance to sit in between Apple's totally closed environment and Google/Android's rather anarchic and chaotic one. If they can nail it they'll be doing us all a favor.

So let's hope that Bibik means what he says, that he generates constructive ideas and that Microsoft reads them and listens.
ANON1241186373194
50%
50%
ANON1241186373194,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2012 | 7:01:02 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
"This isn't the entire collection of apps, just the default collection that Microsoft decided upon,"
which will no be a collection of trial offers for software the user doesn't even own or want, and that users wont know how to delete.
herman_munster
50%
50%
herman_munster,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2012 | 6:59:48 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
I think he underestimates users. Of course they'll figure out that scrolling up and down moves left and right. Of course they're going to spend a tremendous amount of time teasing M$ about how up and down does not equal left and right. It will be fun. Because M$ bashing is inherently fun.
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
Slideshows
Data Science: How the Pandemic Has Affected 10 Popular Jobs
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  9/9/2020
Commentary
The Growing Security Priority for DevOps and Cloud Migration
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  9/3/2020
Commentary
Dark Side of AI: How to Make Artificial Intelligence Trustworthy
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  9/15/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT Automation Transforms Network Management
In this special report we will examine the layers of automation and orchestration in IT operations, and how they can provide high availability and greater scale for modern applications and business demands.
Slideshows
Flash Poll