Firefox Browser Going On A Memory Diet - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Cloud // Software as a Service
News
3/24/2009
07:28 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Firefox Browser Going On A Memory Diet

Mozilla officials admit Firefox continues to rely on a monolithic architecture that can lead to instability and memory leaks.

Mozilla, faced with more insistent competition for Web browser market share from Apple, Google, and Microsoft, is asking for help managing Firefox's appetite for memory.

In a blog post on Monday, Ben Galbraith, co-director of developer tools at Mozilla, explains that browsers are evolving from page-rendering applications into application runtime environments. As that change occurs, browsers can provide many of the functions of operating systems. That, incidentally, is why Microsoft tried so hard to eliminate Netscape not so long ago.

Galbraith credits this shift partly to Google's "creation of boundary-pushing 'desktop-quality' applications" and its evangelization of its Chrome browser as an application runtime. That's generous praise given that Google's decision last year to introduce a browser of its own raised questions that still haven't been satisfactorily answered about the future of the relationship between Google and Mozilla.

One thing that might quiet worries about rising friction between the two organizations would be seeing Firefox back at the head of the browser technology race. If Firefox remains strong, it should continue to be able to collect revenue from Google, not to mention Microsoft or Yahoo, in exchange for searches sent through the browser's search box.

Over the past few years, Firefox set the pace of browser innovation. But it has been caught or passed by Chrome 2, Safari 4, and Internet Explorer 8. The competition has been getting faster and has added advanced features like pre-emptive threading and memory protection for tabs.

Firefox continues to rely on a monolithic architecture that can lead to instability and memory leaks, which have bedeviled Firefox's developers for years. It's a problem aggravated when Firefox plug-ins aren't coded well. Particularly in light of Chrome's responsiveness and low-memory footprint, it's clear that Firefox needs some help, even it remains far more feature-rich than the competition.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Commentary
The Best Way to Get Started with Data Analytics
John Edwards, Technology Journalist & Author,  7/8/2020
Slideshows
10 Cyberattacks on the Rise During the Pandemic
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  6/24/2020
News
IT Trade Shows Go Virtual: Your 2020 List of Events
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  5/29/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Key to Cloud Success: The Right Management
This IT Trend highlights some of the steps IT teams can take to keep their cloud environments running in a safe, efficient manner.
Slideshows
Flash Poll