Enterprise Software Wakes Up From Nap Time, Wants Juice And A Cookie - InformationWeek

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Commentary
4/4/2006
02:09 PM
Mitch Wagner
Mitch Wagner
Commentary
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Enterprise Software Wakes Up From Nap Time, Wants Juice And A Cookie

It's very satisfying to hear an observation that's both completely new and--once you hear it--blindingly obvious. Jason Maynard, a software analyst for Credit Suisse, did that for me at the InformationWeek Spring Conference this week when he observed that there's been almost no innovation in enterprise software for the past five years or so. With the exception of the RIM BlackBerry, the enterprise sof

It's very satisfying to hear an observation that's both completely new and--once you hear it--blindingly obvious. Jason Maynard, a software analyst for Credit Suisse, did that for me at the InformationWeek Spring Conference this week when he observed that there's been almost no innovation in enterprise software for the past five years or so.

With the exception of the RIM BlackBerry, the enterprise software industry hasn't produced any tools in that time that have enhanced worker productivity, Maynard said.Ironically (and this part isn't from Maynard), the same period has seen an explosion of personal productivity tools on the Web, including online word processors, online project management tools, and more. Google alone has been a powerhouse of productivity tools on the Web. The search engine itself is jet fuel for researchers, and Gmail provides a Web-based E-mail application as sophisticated as desktop E-mail. Blogging tools like the Google-owned Blogger, along with TypePad and Movable Type, provide communications that coordinate recovery from global disasters, influence presidential elections, help companies stay in touch with employees, customers, suppliers, and partners, and help people stay in touch with their friends and family.

Maynard said emerging technologies like virtualization, on-demand, and open source will energize the software market. Reporter Larry Greenemeier has more in an article, and Stephanie Stahl interviews Maynard on video in a segment of The News Show.

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