Bing Search Share Rises, Google And Yahoo Slip - InformationWeek

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8/18/2009
07:32 PM
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Bing Search Share Rises, Google And Yahoo Slip

Summer, usually a slow time for search, has given Microsoft something to smile about: The company's Bing search engine gained market share.

Microsoft's share of the U.S. search market grew slightly in July, while Google and Yahoo experienced slight declines.

Of the 13.6 billion U.S. searches conducted in July, 64.7% were conducted through Google sites, a 0.3 percent point decline from June, according to ComScore.

Yahoo sites in July served 19.3% of those searches, also a 0.3 percentage point decline from the previous month.

Microsoft Bing's search share increased by half of a percentage point in July. Its gain accounted for most of what Google and Yahoo lost. Microsoft sites served 8.9% of U.S. searches last month.

As a percentage change, Google's search query total fell by 4%, Yahoo's fell by 5%, and Microsoft's increased by 2%.

Ask and AOL accounted for 3.9% and 3.1% of the search market in July, respectively.

ComScore's search share figures do not include searches related to mapping, local directory, and user-generated video sites.

While any gain is good news, Microsoft still has a long way to go. In February, prior to Bing's launch, ComScore put Microsoft's share of the U.S. search market at 8.5%.

In terms of worldwide search market share, Google processed 78.45% of all searches in July, according to NetApplications. Bing had 3.17%, behind China's Baidu (8.87%) and Yahoo (7.15%).

Not only does Microsoft have a lot of ground to cover before it draws even with Google, but it also faces a competitor that isn't standing still.

Google last week unveiled a developer preview of its new Web search architecture called "Caffeine." The search leader clearly has no intention of letting Bing's gain go unchallenged.

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